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Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (1): 218–238.
Published: 01 March 1994
... youths have not found this source of spirituality to be a means for self and community development. If West is correct in his assessment that rap music provides the primary (albeit truncated) mode of spirituality available to black youth, then the church needs to give serious attention to the art form...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1989) 3 (2): 142–145.
Published: 01 September 1989
... the cultural and social sensibilities of our youth. That is why so many of us value it as an ongoing repository of black culture and think of black pop singers and musicians as curators, after a fashion, of the Afro-American cultural archives. That is also why we are paying close attention to rap music...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (1): 239–253.
Published: 01 March 1994
...Mark D. Hulsether Copyright © 1994 by Duke University Press 1994 Jesus and Madonna: North American Liberation Theologies and Secular Popular Music Mark D. Hulsether Tomorrow I am scheduled to speak to my church's youth group on the topic "Jesus and Madonna" (yes, the Madonna who sings...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1989) 3 (2): 146–158.
Published: 01 September 1989
... the contradictions of being human. He highlights what it means to be both spiritual and carnal."4 Eventually shifting emphasis, the article proceeds to discuss the priestly nature of the theological study of popular music: Spencer believes the Christian church can better evangelize today's youths and minister...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (1): 1–11.
Published: 01 March 1991
... insurrection that allows it to penetrate white defenses. Of course, not all rap is a protest music of insurrectionary knowledges or sexualities; some of it is simply pop-or, as some rappers call it, "candy rap." Nonetheless, rap-whether pop or hard-coreattracts youths who are resentment listen ers, who listen...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1992) 6 (1): 268–273.
Published: 01 March 1992
... vigor. Rap artists sense that as they are inventing a musical genre that measures the pulse of black youth culture, they are also inventing themselves. From the ready resources of culture, history, tradition, and community, rap artists fashion musical personae who literally voice their hopes, fears...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (1): 12–24.
Published: 01 March 1991
... a passing fad, a playful, harmlessly nonsensical, and ephemeral form of cultural high jinks that steamed off the musical energies of urban black teens. As it became obvious that rap was here to stay, a permanent fixture in black ghetto youths' musical landscape, the reactions changed from dismissal...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1993) 7 (2): xiii–xiv.
Published: 01 September 1993
... Africa Conference of Churches (AACC) in Nairobi, Kenya; Solomon Mbabi-Katana, retired music professor of Makerere University in Kampala, Uganda; Eustice Rutiba, head of the Department of Religious Studies and Philosophy at Makerere University; Andrew Muwowo, national youth director of the United Church...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1989) 3 (2): 125–132.
Published: 01 September 1989
... to no one. His erotic mysticism and prophetic vision have made him a figure firmly grounded in the history of black messiahs. Standing uniquely in the tradition of black radicalism and touching the sensibilities of today's youths when he calls for an assault on human misery, Prince has made votaries...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (2): 68–69.
Published: 01 September 1991
... Copyright © 1991 by Duke University Press 1991 As the Negro School Sings The present high tide of interest in the Negro folk song is not, or should not be, without significance to Negro schools, especially those institutions dedicated to fitting the youth of the race for life work. Unheard...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1992) 6 (1): 265–267.
Published: 01 March 1992
... gnosticism, as opposed to those rappers who mute this aspect of transcendence. Rap is the jazz of an overlooked "talented tenth" engaging in selfdeterminative moral/political leadership. Polemicists shaping values among today's black youths, the rappers with a salient message address issues such as drug...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (1): 25–40.
Published: 01 March 1991
.... Further, rap lyrics encourage urban youths to feel a sense of pride and competitiveness. Protest rhetoric, as Richard Gregg has shown, serves an ego-function, allowing the rhetor the opportunity to replace negative images of selfhood with images of self-love, strength, determination, and action.9 Having...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1992) 6 (1): 250–252.
Published: 01 March 1992
... to return to the "golden age" of sexual chastity and repression. In the meantime, our youth continue to float on clouds of anxiety and meaninglessness; our priests still remain encapsulated within institutions whose death knell sounds daily; our prophets invoke values and judgments that fail to inspire...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1993) 7 (2): 63–65.
Published: 01 September 1993
..., xiv, 4 Otieno, Luckio, 4 Patterson, Edward George, 19 1 26 Pierce, N. D ., xiv poor, needs of, 21 6,15 1 16 Presbyterian Youth Centers, xiii Rempel, Marie, 4 Rutiba, Eustice, xiii, 41 12 1 30, 31 1 32 Index 6S Saint Peter's Major Seminary, 26 Semugoma, Sylvia, 4 Sikukuu, Chris, 4, 52 Sikwese, Mercy, 4...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1992) 6 (1): 143–145.
Published: 01 March 1992
... the music and the dance halls, cabarets, and underground taverns that helped scandalize the morals of black youths: "Our sedate young ladies . .. , tearing down every conceivable hope of redemption, abandon themselves into such frenzied, epileptic contortions as 'snake-hip,' 'black-bottom' and the vulgar...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1993) 7 (2): ix–xii.
Published: 01 September 1993
... in the coming years: (1) societal transformation, (2) the needs of youth, (3) the needs of women, and (4) church renewal. In the years following the Chilema assembly, ACLCA's programs have been especially centered around the theme "Learning for Transformation," and we have committed ourselves to developing our...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (1): 51–59.
Published: 01 March 1991
... black American experience, but from an entirely fresh perspective: the perspective of urban black youths. Although rap is a unique and innovative black musical form, there are elements within it that continue the traditional African and African-American cultural values and musical genres...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1990) 4 (2): 109–112.
Published: 01 September 1990
... the confining epistemology of Western philosophy. But theomusicology also sees a new form of "prophetic pragmatism" evolving on the American horizon-rap, the jazz of an unlikely tenth of talent engaging in a youthful moral/political leadership. The rappers respond to various societal crises at given historical...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1993) 7 (2): 5–48.
Published: 01 September 1993
... and European theological interpretations of the Bible, we fulfilled the biblical mandate to worship God intensely through dancing and drumming (2 Samuel 6:1-5; Psalm 150:3-5). It was through the concern expressed by youths, explained Ncozana, that some of our churches managed to break with some...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (1): 178–201.
Published: 01 March 1994
...? Against our helpless ears to fling Its crash, clash, cling, clang, bing, bang, bang, bing? 14 11. Stravinsky quoted in Eksteins, Rites of Spring, 39. 12. Bernard Holland, "'Sacre Du Printemps; at So, Thunders with Youth," New York Times, March 4, 1993, p. C22; Gilman quoted in James Lyons, liner note...