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Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (1): 25–40.
Published: 01 March 1991
...Ronald Jemal Stephens Copyright © 1991 by Duke University Press 1991 The Three Waves ol Contemporary Rap Musi, Ronald femal Stephens The person of words has always played an important part in the social structure of African-American culture. 1 Over a period of nearly four hundred years...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1990) 4 (1): 50.
Published: 01 March 1990
... the storm of life is raging, And the waves like billows roll , His strength is sufficient for all. He can speak the storm to quietness, And command the waves be still, His strength is sufficient for all. Words : John Howardton Smith EVANGELISM AND WITNESS ...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (1): 60–67.
Published: 01 March 1991
... articulates the primacy of the mind by describing the relationship between the psychology and physiology of the transcendent experience: Music Feelings in the music Happy music Keeps me jumping to it Sound waves to my brain Connected to my heart I sing Electrify my hands and hips Motivate my feet to skip...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1992) 6 (1): 282–294.
Published: 01 March 1992
..., jerk, boogaloo, philly dog, and skate. With the appearance of George Clinton's innovative Funkadelic and Parliament, a new wave of funk appeared: technofunk. Never before had black folk heard such deliberately distorted voice and contrapuntal rhythmic effects filtered through electronic...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (2): 133–135.
Published: 01 September 1994
... leave with a prayer in ma heart, 'Backwater won't rise no more!" Similarly Lightnin' Hopkins sang these words when he faced a fatal hurricane: "Yes, I was sittin' in my kitchen, I was lookin' way out across the wave; I see that mean old twister comin', I started in to pray." So, Lomax does a good job...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1990) 4 (2): 35–39.
Published: 01 September 1990
... the mountain, he kneeled to pray and a hush suddenly engulfed the house. Some worshipers began to speak in unknown tongues, while others became possessed. Following the prayer, the Bishop stood and waved his hands and the presiding elder (standing below) instructed the people to look into Daddy's face "because...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1992) 6 (2): 81–85.
Published: 01 September 1992
... the water and listening to the sound of the waves will not help him. He must reach beneath what his objective facul­ ties disclose to him to contact there the spirit of that which he wishes to portray. Having done so he receives the motive or germ he needs although it may not come for hours or even days...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1989) 3 (2): 68–74.
Published: 01 September 1989
..., A sea was storming inside of me. Baby I think I'm capsizing, The waves are rising and rising. And when I get that feeling, I want sexual healing. Sexual healing it's good for me, Makes me feel so fine, it's such a rush, Helps to relieve the mind, and it's good for us. Sexual healing, baby, it's good...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1988) 2 (2): 19–22.
Published: 01 September 1988
..., or introducing a speaker will sometimes raise a song of praise and solicit such forms of collective witness as "lifting the hands" or giving the Lord a "wave offering." This sort of collective worship, often yielding tumultuous moments of praise in which an entire congregation is enraptured, is described...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1990) 4 (2): 40–46.
Published: 01 September 1990
..., 0 Lord." Like an answering wave comes from the congregation of colored people"Standing in the need of prayer." Fifteen minutes later as the closing prayer in the service of Holy Baptism is finished and the procession of priest and acolytes starts toward the sanctuary, again the priest's voice...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (2): 75–80.
Published: 01 September 1994
..., and the ghosts of my forefathers rise and fall with the undulating waves. Across these same waters bow many years ago they came! What were the inchoate mutterings locked tight within the circle of their hearts! In the deep, heavy darkness of the foul-smelling bold of the ship, where they could not see the sky...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (2): 84–90.
Published: 01 September 1991
... of Newport News, Hampton, and Phoebus, gathered at Old Point Comfort docks, and amid cheering, the waving of handkerchiefs, crying, and singing, the Hampton Institute Choir set sail. Receptions in honor of the Hampton Institute Choir overseas began May 1, when the Lord Mayor of Plymouth, accompanied...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1992) 6 (2): 124–132.
Published: 01 September 1992
... to be settled in the present conflict is that of the status of minorities all over the world. This has caused a healthy wave of interest in a good many matters that were once thought to be taboo. Some few publishers are getting enough courage to bring out books and articles that would not have been tolerated...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (1): 41–50.
Published: 01 March 1991
... phenomenal success. Led by the astute rapper Chuck D (Carlton Ridenhour) and backed by the comical Flavor-Flav (William Drayton) and DJ Terminator X (Norman Rodgers), Public Enemy is attempting to redefine the content of rap. Since r 987, the group has become the spokesperson for a new wave of African...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (1): 12–24.
Published: 01 March 1991
... to grow, but its self-defined, continuing challenge is to maintain its aesthetic, cultural, and political proximity to its site of original expression: the "ghetto poor." Interestingly, a new wave of rap artists may be accomplishing this goal, but with foreboding consequences. For example, NWA (Niggaz...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (2): 1–29.
Published: 01 September 1994
...) began to encourage local expressions in worship, including African masses and the use of African instruments. t9 A second wave of Western Christian missionary activity came from the Wesleyan and American Great Awakening revivals. Placing emphasis on a free worship, these churches encouraged...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (1): 218–238.
Published: 01 March 1994
... cry aloud, wave their hands, and fan their faces in 230 Black Sacred Music Hammer's church. But women do not act in the places of pain; they look on, helpless. They weep at the graveside but do not act. This is consistent with a certain invisibility of women, or better put, an objectification of women...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (1): 13–35.
Published: 01 March 1994
... of music is meant to exclude are those sounds of nature, however beautiful or ugly, made by singing birds, barking dogs, wind-swept leaves and branches, thunder, waves lapping the beach, and the like. I also mean to exclude sounds produced by human activity and the machines we have made, from the hum...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (1): 109–134.
Published: 01 March 1994
... or in their farm wagons. I remember how the great waves of sound used to come through the trees-when things like Beulah Land, Woodworth, Nearer My God To Thee, The Shining Shore, Nettleton, In the Sweet Bye and Bye and the like were sung by thousands of "let out" souls.3 And did the singing and the preaching take...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1993) 7 (2): 5–48.
Published: 01 September 1993
... to be led even further away from past traditions. Thus, in many instances we are increasingly losing our capability to create music that is authentically traditional. Even if some of us could create traditional music, many of our youths prefer the new waves of music to the old ways, particularly those...