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violence

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Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1989) 3 (2): 142–145.
Published: 01 September 1989
... Center and wife of Tennessee's Democratic Senator Albert Gore, Jr., has stated that rap music appeals to "angry, disillusioned, unloved kids," and tells them it is "okay to beat people up." Gore's words followed on the heels of a rap concert tour that was marred by violence in several cities. At the Long...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (1): 12–24.
Published: 01 March 1991
... expresses and causes violence. Tipper Gore has repeatedly said that rap music appeals to "angry, disillusioned, unloved kids" and tells them it is "okay to beat people up." Violent incidents at rap concerts in Los Angeles, Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Atlanta, Cincinnati, and New York have only reinforced...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (1): 25–40.
Published: 01 March 1991
... of New York, as a rhetorical device designed to combat juvenile violence and drug abuse. Street gangs had escalated their rivalry to a frightening level of violence between 1968 and 1973,10 and many youths who left the gangs following this period decided to release their frustrations in more positive...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (1): 68–79.
Published: 01 March 1991
... explicit nature of most of the lyrics of As Nasty as They Wanna Be, and their portrayal of women as objects for sexual assault-lyrics that some critics claim promote violence against women. For instance, in the rap "Dick Almighty" we hear these words: 2. Henry Louis Gates, Jr., "2 Live Crew Decoded," N ew...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1992) 6 (1): 265–267.
Published: 01 March 1992
... explicitly theological judgments against rap but rather describe it as unmusical "street poetry" that, occasionally instigating violence and propagating negative messages,1 is obviously rooted in a profane street ethic. For instance, criticism of some rappers' use of profanity hints toward an implicit...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (1): 239–253.
Published: 01 March 1994
... other cultural texts, do have a range of interpretations which have greater or lesser plausibility. It seems fair to say that one major context for Jackson's song is the pervasive reality of male supremacy and sexual violence, and that through this video Jackson uses the power of MTV to pro- Last Night...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (1): 89–94.
Published: 01 March 1991
..., 12 Martin, Sarah, 51 Martinez, Bob, 69 MC Hammer, 8, IO, 60-67; as sha- man, 62-63, 65-66, 67 MC Lyte, 34, 57 MC Shan, 16, 34 MC Supreme, 4 "Me So Horny," 78 media: and its influence on audi- ence behavior or attitudes, 71, 79; violence in the, 75 Melle Mel, 13, 32, 33 "The Message," 13-14, 30, 33-34...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (1): 85–87.
Published: 01 March 1991
... the Violence." Billboard 98 (November 8, 1986): 9. Dery, Mark. "Public Enemy Confrontation." Keyboard (September 1990): 81 - 96. Grein, Paul. "Rap Racks up Its First Platinum LP: Run-D.M.C. Leads July Charts." Billboard 98 (August 16, 1986): 4, 8r. Leland, John. "Armageddon in Effect." Spin (October 1988): 46...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (1): 218–238.
Published: 01 March 1994
... worldviews between church and world, with the result that not much attention has been paid to how "secular" music shapes the theo-ethical perspectives of church youths, save for the standard forays against sex, violence, and drugs. Theomusicology, for us, becomes a discipline that encourages...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1987) 1 (2): 1–16.
Published: 01 September 1987
..., which singing symbolized, and violence, which supremacy symbolized, had come face to face, and it was a racial confrontation involving the entire nation, which the South symbolized. No longer eclipsed by a "window darkly," faith and faith had come face to face, and the supremacists would...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1993) 7 (1): 62–70.
Published: 01 March 1993
... to be committed to violence as a means for keeping their unjust ideas of human relationship intact. The more civilized but still unjust methods of government officials, under the guise of "law and order," were no less violent and no less warlike. Oppressors have always studied war well. Perhaps it could be argued...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1990) 4 (2): 60–61.
Published: 01 September 1990
... and agitator, Langston saw self-help, protest, politics, and, when necessary and feasible, even violence as complementary rather than contradictory means to promote black rights and secure black liberation. The Negro must indeed be irrepressible in provoking the conflict that could bring freedom. (349...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1990) 4 (2): 96–97.
Published: 01 September 1990
... writers will probe white power, laying bare both its violence and its complexity and subtlety. It will be seen to affect plot, scene, character, language, image, and symbol because it will be seen to violate necessarily inviolable territories of the black self. (so) Boole Reviews 9T As racism persisted...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1990) 4 (2): 86–88.
Published: 01 September 1990
... to be today), the People's Songsters did not view themselves as Stalinists. As the first socialist country, the Soviet Union was no doubt the paradigm of communism (19). The People's Songsters simply believed America was degenerating into widespread poverty, unemployment, labor violence, and racism...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1990) 4 (2): 94–96.
Published: 01 September 1990
... a significant place in both the consciousness and the literary expression of blacks from slavery to the present" (49 ). Petesch continues-and this is how black literature can inform theomusicologists as they strive to comprehend the world: Black writers will probe white power, laying bare both its violence...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1990) 4 (2): 61–63.
Published: 01 September 1990
... and agitator, Langston saw self-help, protest, politics, and, when necessary and feasible, even violence as complementary rather than contradictory means to promote black rights and secure black liberation. The Negro must indeed be irrepressible in provoking the conflict that could bring freedom. (349...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (1): 254–264.
Published: 01 March 1994
... to the oppression going on in South Africa or the oppression going on in south Texas-just be happy! If our goal is nothing but happiness then we should close our eyes and our minds to the injustices in Central America or in central Los Angeles. If we want only happiness then we should ignore the violence in Bosnia...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1990) 4 (2): 112–116.
Published: 01 September 1990
... moment for Anderson was not simply when he saw the dehumanizing aspects of Chicago's violence, labor disputes, and strikes, but when he recalled the coal soot falling down on his apartment bed, leaving him an early-morning black face-an apt image for one who was discovering the underside of the city...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (2): 105–109.
Published: 01 September 1994
..., it is the central strategy of the engineers of moral panic to make strategic synecdoches whereby a group like 2 Live Crew becomes a sign that rap music leads to rape and violence. Baker condemns Gates's testimony on the same ethical grounds that the antirap forces employ with a broader brush-that 2 Live Crew's...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (2): 128–133.
Published: 01 September 1994
... of the blues-in both instances because whites lack the social location of blues people. Who are authentic blues people? According to Spencer, they are those immersed in the cultural reality of black life who are subject both physically and economically to state-sanctioned violence. Blues people are those who...