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Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1995) 9 (1-2): 216–229.
Published: 01 September 1995
... Copyright © 1995 by Duke University Press 1995 Chapter 13 Urban-Rural Cycle I When considering Negro folk music, one automatically thinks of rural folk, and rightly so. The legend of Negro folk music has developed around primitive people. The store of tales, true and imagined, which have...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1993) 7 (1): 88–90.
Published: 01 March 1993
...Jon Michael Spencer Michael W. Harris . The Rise of Gospel Blues: The Music of Thomas Andrew Dorsey in the Urban Church . New York : Oxford University Press , 1992 . Pp. xxiii , 324. Copyright © 1993 by Duke University Press 1993 88 Black Sacred Music Michael W. Harris...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (2): 1–29.
Published: 01 September 1994
... from local buses and matatus (Kenya's passenger vehicles) and make their way down a palm-lined sandy path to a mud and plaster church compound. A pastor from the Penteco·stal church of the urban city Mombasa, old women from deep in the hinterland of Ugiriamani, a Baptist deacon from Kanamai, a youth...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1990) 4 (2): 112–116.
Published: 01 September 1990
... not replace storytelling with sociological descanting, many of his characters are in effect psychological studies tracing the effects of urbanization and industrialization on human nature (264, 268). "Convinced that 'going to the city' and the fulfillment of the American Dream were related," says Williams...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1989) 3 (2): 142–145.
Published: 01 September 1989
..., and to the criticism it has evoked.I Rap, of course, is especially popular among urban black teenagers. With its staccato beats, its driving, lancing rhythms, and its hip lyrics, it reflects its origins in their world: a world that is increasingly an odyssey-through the terror of ghetto gangs, drugs, and racismin...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (1): 12–24.
Published: 01 March 1991
... a passing fad, a playful, harmlessly nonsensical, and ephemeral form of cultural high jinks that steamed off the musical energies of urban black teens. As it became obvious that rap was here to stay, a permanent fixture in black ghetto youths' musical landscape, the reactions changed from dismissal...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (2): 105–109.
Published: 01 September 1994
... position on the hip-hop crowd at this event seems clearly that of a spectator, although one with a particular capability to recognize the subversive potential of what he sees and hears. In his second chapter, "The Black Urban Beat: Rap and the Law," Baker offers a more focused and critically honed reading...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (2): 128–133.
Published: 01 September 1994
... labors at this latter task while efficiently narrating the transformation of the blues from its country form to its urban form. Through three lengthy chapters and an extensive introduction and conclusion, Spencer attempts to cast light on the theological architecture of the blues. The introduction...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1989) 3 (1): 1–5.
Published: 01 March 1989
... Folk Music," Rappin' and Sty/in' Out: Communication in Urban Black America. ed. Thomas Kochman (Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 1977). pp. 65-82. In this line of argument, Indian music is not taken into account because it is not considered American in the cultural sense. 5See Jeremiah A. Wright...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (1): 51–59.
Published: 01 March 1991
... of the historical experience of blacks in American society and therefore can be read as history. More recently, a new black musical form called "rap" or "hip-hop" has evolved from the contemporary urban descendants of southern blacks of the Great Migration. Like its black musical precursors, rap also describes...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (1): 25–40.
Published: 01 March 1991
...; Kochman, "Toward an Ethnography of Black Communication," in Rappin' and Stylin' Out: Communication in Urban Black America, ed. Thomas Kochman (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1979); William Labov, "Rules for Ritual Insults," in Language in the Inner City (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (2): 99–104.
Published: 01 September 1994
... Reviews 101 tradictory characters and scenes in black life. For example, Dyson contends that rap music and hip-hop culture reveal the realities and yearnings of black urban America. He asserts that black youths are inventing themselves, assessing America, illuminating their specific style, language...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1992) 6 (1): 274–281.
Published: 01 March 1992
... and flourishing alternative to a burgeoning juvenocracy in the urban inner city, where young black jmostly) men under the age of twenty-five reign over significant segments of black postindustrial urban space, sustained on goods and services produced by an underground political economy of criminal activity...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (2): 136–138.
Published: 01 September 1994
... piece of urban anthropology from the "etic" (outsider's) perspective-nor as a work possibly cast, in certain parts, as a self-reflexive fieldwork account that contrasts urban worlds white and black. But this is what the book is to a substantial degree. This is also a book about contradictions in black...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1995) 9 (1-2): 162–174.
Published: 01 September 1995
... observed this practice not only in rural churches but in many urban churches as well. At the present time I have recognized more of a denominational character in the shout than a general racial trait. The point I am making is that there is no justification for making the shout the basis for generalizations...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1995) 9 (1-2): 175–181.
Published: 01 September 1995
... for mixed voices in four parts, which was issued in two forms by a leading Negro publishing house. One form used the shape-note and the other used the standard note. One gathers from this situation that the shape-note edition was created with the rural Negro in mind, since urban Negroes do not use the shape...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (1): 64–77.
Published: 01 March 1994
... is the highest value in blues.s There is likewise a theology in rap which proceeds from the rapper's presumption that truth is of great importance. That truth is central to the rapper's expression of the urban black experience is evident, for example, in the rap "The Message" by Grandmaster Flash and the Furious...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1992) 6 (1): 282–294.
Published: 01 March 1992
... in the ever-blackening urban centers throughout the USA, secular attitudes proliferated and financial rewards for nomeligious and nonjazz black popular music escalated. On the one hand, jazz - under the influence of John Coltrane, Miles Davis, Omette Coleman, and others - became more and more a kind...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1988) 2 (1): 87–88.
Published: 01 March 1988
.... Goreau, Laurraine. Just Mahalia, Baby. Gretna, Louisiana: Pelican, 1984. Harris, Sheldon. Blues Who's Who: A Biographical Dictionary ofBlues Singers. New York: Da Capo Press, 1979. Keil, Charles. Urban Blues. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1966. lead Me, Guide Me: The African American Catholic...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1990) 4 (2): 91–92.
Published: 01 September 1990
... northward because in the South they were laboring under a new kind of slavery-sharecropping and debt peonage-and no emancipation was in sight. But when theomusicology observes radical anticulturalism in the theology of the gospel songs that evolved in black people 's homes in the urban North during...