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slave

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Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1988) 2 (1): 51–64.
Published: 01 March 1988
...Henry Hugh Proctor © Copyright 1988 JBSM /Jon Michael Spencer 1988 The Theology of the Songs of the Southern Slave Henry Hugh Proctor This essay was Rev. Henry Hugh Proctor's (1868-1933) Bachelor of Divinity degree thesis at Yale School of Divinity in 1894. Having received his undergraduate...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1989) 3 (1): 74–75.
Published: 01 March 1989
...John B. Boles Boles , John B. , ed. Masters and Slaves in the House of the Lord: Race and Religion in the American South, 1740-1870 . Lexington : The University Press of Kentucky , 1988 . © Copyright 1989 JBSM /Jon Michael Spencer 1989 74 The Journal of Black Sacred Music...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1989) 3 (1): 22–52.
Published: 01 March 1989
... burthen to bearNo one on earth for my soul who will care. Here is no rest, here's no rest . Here I'm a slave, and a slave must remain; Here is no rest; here is no rest! Winter and summer to me are the same; Here is no rest; here is no rest! Here I must labor though tempests may blow; 28 The Journal...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1988) 2 (1): 45–50.
Published: 01 March 1988
... of the minstrel's lyre? (James Weldon Johnson)' The term .. slave" generally brings to mind a series of negative images which most Americans associate with the African slave trade. However, nowhere is the slave (or servant) more dramatically portrayed than in the Bible, which unfolds a striking illustration...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1992) 6 (1): 55–67.
Published: 01 March 1992
... in their blues a new world in the making, a world not yet here but coming. Although Negro slaves were taken from intensely religious cultures where religion was an integral part of their daily life, they were forced to abandon their religious ways as soon as they were placed on Southern farms . Slaveowners...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1993) 7 (1): 17–28.
Published: 01 March 1993
..., the constant (though dwindling) importation of newly enslaved people served to shore up some of the natural cultural decline that was occurring. But regardless of the rate of importation or contact with new Africans, black slaves in mainland America created culture using both older modes passed on to them from...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1989) 3 (1): 1–5.
Published: 01 March 1989
... it became an essential part of black worship. The slave songs, the sorrow songs, or the Negro spirituals (as they came to be called), are the most outstanding and beautiful artifacts from the ugliest period of North American history. 4 From this earliest period of Africans living in diaspora in North...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1992) 6 (2): 207–214.
Published: 01 September 1992
... to the originators, sometimes not. When slaves were imported from Africa, they brought with them no material possessions: only what talents were inherent in their beings. In America, as in Africa, there was a genuine, spontaneous outpouring of these talents. Three distict types of Negro music were created...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1989) 3 (1): 72–74.
Published: 01 March 1989
..., "My Country," make an appeal to the oppressors on behalf of the slave by portraying America as the professed "land of liberty Again the appeal is principally moral. "As in the previous group," says Eaklor, "many of these lyrics combine liberty-and American history-with God . . , but God ' s presence...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1993) 7 (1): 56–61.
Published: 01 March 1993
... why Israel refused to sing. The text declares, "By the rivers of Babylon, there we sat down and wept." Suffering and slavery are always characterized by bodies of water. The Hebrew slaves of Egypt suffered down by the river Nile. Likewise, Afro-Americans labored in pain down by the Mississippi River...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1989) 3 (1): 14–21.
Published: 01 March 1989
... had erupted two years earlier over the status of territories acquired in the Mexican War, and the Compromise of 1850 revealed that slavery had become central to the moral, constitutional, and economic debates of the republic. Engendering the greatest controversy was a new Fugitive Slave Law enacting...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1992) 6 (1): 36–46.
Published: 01 March 1992
... and the turn of the century, the blues represent the ex-slaves' confrontation with a more secular evaluation of the world. They were shaped in the context of social and political oppression, but they do not, as Maulana Karenga said, collectively "teach resignation." To hear the blues in this manner...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1987) 1 (2): 40–41.
Published: 01 September 1987
..., till all is wrought! Freedom the encl he sought-Free-dom for slaves. AfL2 :f:: J~ . ,. _. 1:2. . 2 Battles all ended now-silent the clamor,Freedom for one and all-never more slave-- No more the auction block-no more the ham- merRansom that paid it all, blood of the brave. Still "Forward," is his cry...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1990) 4 (2): 83–86.
Published: 01 September 1990
... in situations of profane oppression (12). After all, the Catholic church has been and continues to be rather disruptive in the lives of black Haitians. Were it not so, slaves would not have had to place their hope for liberation in the hands of their Joas (spirits), who they believed were certain to triumph...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (1): 51–59.
Published: 01 March 1991
..., good, evil, love, hate, and hope. Early blues, the true foundation of all secular black music in America, was created by impoverished ex-slaves in southern rural communities. In African-American musical history we actually come full circle in rap, which, though dating back only to the mid-seventies...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1995) 9 (1-2): 147–161.
Published: 01 September 1995
... years following the Civil War, was able to obtain from Coffins Point, St. Helena Island, South Carolina, the first 57 (out of 136) songs appearing in Slave Songs of the United States. Fully 79 of the songs came from the Sea Islands grouped off the coast of South Carolina. Very recently Nicholas George...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (2): 108–113.
Published: 01 September 1991
... the nations? But a greater and more psychological fact blasts either of these assumptions, and that is, that had the American people, prior to '66, been of the bible-studying, prayer-maintaining, brotherhood-loving, freedom-craving, heaven-aspiring type sufficient to enthuse the slave with the spirit...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1992) 6 (1): 98–140.
Published: 01 March 1992
... "Slave to the Blues," which peculiarly pictured a fair-skinned woman about to be clutched by the pointy fingers of a dark evil figure identified as "Blues. "37 As I will explain even more as we proceed, the character that personified the blues hardly resembled Paramount's demonic figure or the devil...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1990) 4 (2): 102–104.
Published: 01 September 1990
... and its degree of distinctiveness as compared to white dialects (2). In order to search out answers to these questions, Schneider examines some two thousand ex-slave narratives collected by the Federal Writers Project in the mid-thirties, along with several sound recordings made around the same time...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (2): 104–107.
Published: 01 September 1991
.... On the plantation, the makers of these songs were slaves, hirelings, chattels, with minds and bodies subject to the wills and whims of their masters. At their own "meetings," often held in secret, they were utterly themselves, and thoughts and impulses and emotions burst forth with an exuberance all the more...