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Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1989) 3 (1): 74.
Published: 01 March 1989
...Kip Lornell Lornell , Kip . “Happy in the Service of the Lord”: Afro-American Gospel Quartets in Memphis . Urbana : University of Illinois Press , 1988 . © Copyright 1989 JBSM /Jon Michael Spencer 1989 74 The Journal of Black Sacred Music that the political songs still embodied...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1988) 2 (1): 1–20.
Published: 01 March 1988
... what it means to be black in America . As he later phrased it, "To be black is to be blue"; 11 or, as Memphis Slim put it, "I think all black people can sing the blues more or less." 12 It is venerable that Professor Cone has never forsaken his upbringing in the black community of Bearden, Arkansas...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1989) 3 (1): 74.
Published: 01 March 1989
... at Hunter College and the Graduate Center of City University of New York. Lornell, Kip. "Happy in the Service of the Lord": Afro-American Gospel Quartets in Memphis. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1988. This is essentially an ethnomusicological study of black quartet singing in the musical city...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1989) 3 (1): 74–75.
Published: 01 March 1989
... ofFrench and Comparative Literature at Hunter College and the Graduate Center of City University of New York. Lornell, Kip. "Happy in the Service of the Lord": Afro-American Gospel Quartets in Memphis. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1988. This is essentially an ethnomusicological study of black...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1989) 3 (1): 72–74.
Published: 01 March 1989
... that re-awakens the protagonist to existence. Knapp is Professor ofFrench and Comparative Literature at Hunter College and the Graduate Center of City University of New York. Lornell, Kip. "Happy in the Service of the Lord": Afro-American Gospel Quartets in Memphis. Urbana: University of Illinois Press...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (2): 29–33.
Published: 01 September 1991
..., the present resident supervisor of the Music School Settlement for Colored People in New York, who has written a number of songs for May Irwin, Lillian Russell, and Anna Held. The present craze of the "Blues" was started by another Negro, WC. Handy of Memphis, who wrote the "Memphis Blues." It is true...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (2): 64–68.
Published: 01 September 1994
... to recognize the significance of the blues as music. It is fortunate, too, that he was located in the region along the lower Mississippi, where the blues had their origin and when they began to be widely sung. In 1912 Mr. Handy published the famous "Memphis Blues," which started a musical mode in Tinpan Alley...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1988) 2 (2): 105.
Published: 01 September 1988
... College in Ferrum, Virginia, and author of "Happy in the Service ofthe Lord": Afro-American Gospel Quartets in Memphis (1988) and Virginia's Blues, Country, and Gospel Records 1902-1943: An Annotated Discography (1988). Hugh J. Roberts, Ph.D., is a minister in the United Methodist Church currently...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1989) 3 (2): 85–97.
Published: 01 September 1989
... sing, "There's one thing I know / That I've been born again."9 Of course, from an analytic point of view it must be suggested that 8. Broughton, 12 s. 9. Ibid. For an accounting of the events of October 1974 at Green's Memphis home, see "Al Green: A Mess of Grits and Suicide," Rolling Stone 21...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1987) 1 (1): 53–60.
Published: 01 March 1987
... Publishing Board, Memphis, Tennessee. Two years in the making, the project was conceived by Bishop Nonnan N. Quick and commissioned by Presiding Bishop J. 0. Patterson . Bishop Patterson's preliminary criteria for the hymnal was that it be distinctly stamped "COGIC."2 Yes, Lord! is named after a praise song...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1993) 7 (1): 38–46.
Published: 01 March 1993
... purse or scrip'. He suppressed the disagreeable thought of the hot sun and the sweat, and lingered on the smell of the land and sight of sweet young green things pushin' through the soil. Long time ago that was. Memphis, Greenville, Natchez, Vicksburg, New Orleans. Hitch-hiking an' hoboing. Preachin...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (2): 116–118.
Published: 01 September 1994
... the "womb places" and "home places" of the community. Life emanates from these spaces and one returns to these spaces. Rankin explains, "a native African American Deltan might live in Detroit, Chicago or Memphis for over half a lifetime, but the person's funeral and burial take place at his or her home...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1988) 2 (2): 102–104.
Published: 01 September 1988
... by the National Publishing Board of the Church of Christ (Holiness) U.S.A. in its home town of Jackson, Mississippi, and Yes, Lord!, the hymnal of the Church of God in Christ, published in 1982 by its publishing board in the church's home town of Memphis. Because it has recently gone out of print, the collection...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1989) 3 (2): 17–49.
Published: 01 September 1989
.... They tend to be ritually liberating in that sense."5 "When I have troubles," confirms bluesman Memphis Slim, "the blues is the only thing that helps me-I mean that's the only way to kind of ease my situation."6 To this effect Will Weldon sings in his "Red Hot Blues": All you got to do is just swing and sway...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1989) 3 (1): 53–67.
Published: 01 March 1989
..., which was published by the CME Publishing House, in Memphis, in 1987. Its preface is probably the only printed document which chronicles the musical history of the denomination. Commencing with reference to John Wesley's A Collection of Psalms and Hymns (1737) and the hymns of Charles Wesley...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1988) 2 (2): 29–51.
Published: 01 September 1988
... over the past century. This spiritual music was also captured by commercial record companies as early as 1927. Rev. Leora Ross and the Church of the Living God Jubilee Singers (OKeh Records), the Texas Jubilee Singers (Columbia Records), and Memphis's Holy Ghost Sanctified Singers (Brunswick Records...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (2): 133–138.
Published: 01 September 1991
..., 19 MacDowell, Henry, 28 Margetson, Edward, r 28 Martens, Frederic, 72, 78 Maynor, Dorothy, viii McAdoo Jubilee Singers, 26 McCormack, John, 65 "Memphis Blues," 30 Mendelssohn, 76 minstrelsy, ro, 13, 23, 24, 27, 42, 57-58, 66, 73, IIO, II6; black, 25, 58-59; black music freed from, 28; ridicule...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1992) 6 (2): 136–143.
Published: 01 September 1992
.... The first time I ever heard the "Memphis Blues" was in a southern town. The colored girl who played it for me liked it, but was afraid to play it distinctly because she dared not let the neighbors hear her playing such immoral music! However, when the world found beauty in Negro music, Negroes proudly...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1992) 6 (2): 245–251.
Published: 01 September 1992
... making it a point to listen to Negro music everywhere I went. On Beale Street in Memphis, where I worked with W C. Handy, as an onlooker in small Negro churches, and in popular bands. Although my compositions in Mr. Varese's dissonant idiom brought me to the attention of metropolitan critics, I soon...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1989) 3 (2): 163–169.
Published: 01 September 1989
...-24 Marsalis, Wynton, IOI Martin, Sara, 33-34 Marxism, I 1 5 McKissick, Floyd, 57 McLean, Don, 22 McTell, Blind Willie, 36 Memphis Slim (blues singer), 20 Merriam, Alan, 6 Miller, William Robert, 149 Minton, Henry, 53 Minton's Playhouse, 53 Mitchell, Henry, 14-15, 65, 78 Monk, Thelonius, 146...