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Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (1): 51–59.
Published: 01 March 1991
... Homes is identical in spirit to the "freedom" explored by rapper Kool Moe Dee in "Pump Your Fist." In this rap, Kool Moe Dee not only recognizes that blacks live in a racist society which represses their human potential, he also recognizes that a "slave mentality" is not entirely the fault of the white...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (1): 64–77.
Published: 01 March 1994
... speech and language. An example is Kool Moe Dee's claim that he can, through his rap, "heal sick minds" and "touch the soul," "like Christ himself!' Kool Moe Dee also says that just as there is only one president, one pope, and one God, so is there only one rapper in that class-him.10...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1992) 6 (1): 265–267.
Published: 01 March 1992
...), and by myriad rap songs such as "Knowledge Is King" by Kool Moe Dee and "Holy Intellect" by PRT !which the rap says are "holy as the mind When various writers speak of the "message rappers," the "political rappers," or the "teachers," they are essentially alluding to the "utopian aspirations" inherent to rap...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (1): 89–94.
Published: 01 March 1991
..., 3 5 "King of Rock," 35 knowledge : insurrection of subjugated, 3-4, 7; power of, v, 7-8, 58; street, 4; valuing of in rap, IO-I I, 64 "Knowledge Is King," 11, 57-58 Kochman, Thomas, 36-37 Kool Herc, 1 3, 29 Kool Moe Dee, IO-I 1, 13, 34, 55, 57-59 KRS-One, vi, IO, 1 5- 1 6; and Boogie Down...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (1): 1–11.
Published: 01 March 1991
... the equally prevalent secular corpus of rap that does embody utopian aspirations. Kool Moe Dee has, for instance, a rap titled "God Made Me Funke." Like the God of gospel hip-hop, his is a black God, for only a black God would, after God's own image, make a brother or a sister "funke." Similarly, Public Enemy...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1992) 6 (1): 299–309.
Published: 01 March 1992
..., 2, 22, II3 Karenga,Maulana, 36, 2rr "Keep On Pushing," 206, 215 1 216 Keil, Charles, 40, 55, 57, 64 Kerman, Joseph, r 95 Kershaw, Alvin L., 162, 163 King, B. B., 53, 290 King, Martin Luther, Jr., 1511 2II Kirk, Andy, 162 Kivy, Peter, 26-27 Knight, Gladys, 284 "Knowledge Is King," 266 Kool...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (1): 12–24.
Published: 01 March 1991
... parasitic. As rap grew, its expanded expression was still limited to mostly inner-city neighborhoods and particularly to its place of origin, New York City. Rap artists like Funky 4 Plus r, Kool Moe Dee, Busy Bee, Afrika Bambaata, Cold Rush Brothers, Kurtis Blow, DJ Kool Herc, and Grandmaster Melle Mel were...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (2): 105–109.
Published: 01 September 1994
...: A Black Studies Sounding of Form," would seem to promise at last the resonant historical engagement that Baker practiced on the blues, 108 Black Sacred Music but it remains something of a disappointment. He offers a brief summary of the emergence of hip-hop, from Kool DJ Herc's parties in the park to N. W...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (1): 25–40.
Published: 01 March 1991
... ways. They turned the urban phenomenon of rapping into a vehicle for social change. Some say Kool Herc, the legendary deejay who wandered through the Bronx rapping on street corners, at parties, and in clubs, was the first to pick up where the Last Poets left off, while others credit Grandmaster Flash...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (1): 269–277.
Published: 01 March 1994
..., 184 Jung, Carl G., 37, 57, 192 "Justify My Love," 2 52 Kant, Immanuel, I?, 174 King, Martin Luther, Jr., 222, 225-26, 229, 230-31 Kirkpatrick, John, II5, 123, 124 Kivy, Peter, 61 "Knowledge Is King," 214 Kool Moe Dee, 66, 68, 72, 73, 214 Koskoff, Ellen, 40-41, 42, 59 KRS-One, 68, 214, 242 Ku Klux Klan...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (1): 205–217.
Published: 01 March 1994
...), and by myriad rap songs such as "Knowledge Is King" by Kool Moe Dee and "Holy Intellect" by PRT. These are the prophets of an explicit liberation theology. But the detractors of rap generally ignore these salvational quali- American Popular Music 215 ties while steadily propagating their moralistic judgments...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1992) 6 (1): 282–294.
Published: 01 March 1992
... dominant in Afro-American popular music. Barry White's sensual upbeat tunes, Brass Construction's repetitive syncopations, Kool and the Gang's distinctive Jersey funk, and Nile Rogers and Bernard Edwards's classy chic are exemplary responses to the disco scene. Yet the most important Afro-American response...