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islam

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Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (1): 41–50.
Published: 01 March 1991
...William Eric Perkins Copyright © 1991 by Duke University Press 1991 Nation ol Islam Ideology in the Rap ol Public Enemy William Eric Perkins The racialism of the Negro is no limitation or reservation with respect to American life; it is only a constructive effort to build the obstructions...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (1): 89–94.
Published: 01 March 1991
..., 42 92 Biotic Sotred Musi, Monroe, Sylvester, 54 Moore, Rudy Ray, 74 Motley Criie, 69 "Move on Over or We'll Move on Over You," 3 MTV, 14; and rap, 17, 18 Muhammad, Elijah, 3, 41, 43-49 music production, commercial pro- cess of, 18-19 Nation of Islam, 3, 23, 42; and apocalypticism, 46-47; ideology, 43...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (1): 3–12.
Published: 01 March 1994
... between active participants on the stage and passive, immobilized audience members, is decidedly not music. In my own research I am especially concerned with the meaning of music in the Middle East, particularly in Islam. Here, one can say that the definition and meaning of music depend entirely...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (1): 1–11.
Published: 01 March 1991
... poem "The Revolution Will Not Be Televised," Len Chandler's mid-sixties radical freedom song "Move on Over or We'll Move on Over You," James Brown's latesixties soul song "Say It Loud, I'm Black and I'm Proud," and Louis Farrakhan's first composed song for the Nation of Islam, "A White Man's Heaven...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (2): 30–42.
Published: 01 September 1994
... of the locally composed hymns that emerged from the Aladura tradition manifested a mixture of indigenous and Western musical styles, they had an influence on other popular musical genres of the period, such as juju, which was influenced not only by Aladura musical syncretization but by Islamic musical influences...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1992) 6 (1): 1–29.
Published: 01 March 1992
... with which to commence our query because Jones makes a comment that characterizes the ethnomusicological essays jwhich make up the majority of the fifteen articles). Jones says her aim is to give a historical voice to the long-silenced women's musical culture in the Islamic society of Tunisia...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (1): 36–63.
Published: 01 March 1994
... her aim is to give a historical voice to the longsilenced women's musical culture in the Islamic society of Tunisia and that it will be left up to other specialists to address the "broader" social, legal, and ethical dimensions.13 In a rather objective way, typical of the ethnomusicologist, Jones...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1992) 6 (1): 232–243.
Published: 01 March 1992
... is more like the world than unlike it. Hence Catholicism, unlike Protestantism, Judaism, and Islam, permits angels and saints, shrines and statues, stained glass and incense, and the continuation of pagan customs-most notably for our purposes here, holy water and blessed candles. The point...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (1): 12–24.
Published: 01 March 1991
... even more sociocultural waters with their Nation of Islam views in "Don't Believe the Hype," saying, "The followers of Farrakhan / Don't tell me that you understand until you hear the man." Such rap displays the power and pitfalls associated with the revival of earlier forms of black radicalism...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (1): 205–217.
Published: 01 March 1994
... initially is that Americans are as religious today as they have been ever. Perhaps the only difference between the previous and present forms of religion is that today religion is far more diffused throughout culture. There still remain the institutional religious cultures-Christianity, Judaism, Islam...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1993) 7 (2): 5–48.
Published: 01 September 1993
... become an authentic part of African culture from the outset, then Christendom in Africa probably would not be facing its current crisis of being on the decline in countries where Islam is on the increase. Thus, Ncozana finds it suitable for there to be a meaningful dialogue between worship and the lives...