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Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (2): 124–128.
Published: 01 September 1994
...Willie James Jennings Mozella G. Mitchell , ed. The Human Search: Howard Thurman and the Quest for Freedom . New York : Lang , 1992 . 246 pp. Copyright © 1994 by Duke University Press 1994 124 Black Sacred Music Mozella G. Mitchell, ed. The Human Search: Howard Thurman...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1989) 3 (1): 6–13.
Published: 01 March 1989
... expression and icon theology, as they have been elaborated within the Christian tradition, point to important common beliefs generally shared by all Christians regarding the person and work of Jesus Christ. As "visible and necessary witness[es] to the reality and humanity of Christ," 1 icons are sacramental...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1989) 3 (2): 98–124.
Published: 01 September 1989
... of the twentieth century. As an international superstar, Jackson has captured the devotion of a large segment of the world's population in a manner reserved for a select few historic personages. Jackson strikes a deep, primal chord in the human psyche, fascinating us, perhaps, because he so easily and eerily...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1992) 6 (1): 1–29.
Published: 01 March 1992
... a cognate systematic musicology-the anthropology of music (ethnomusicology), the sociology of music, the psychology of music, and the philosophy of music. Despite its borrowing from the social sciences and humanities, theomusicology is not merely an interdisciplinary study of music that is more or less...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (1): 36–63.
Published: 01 March 1994
... from anthropology, sociology, psychology, and philosophy, each of which has a cognate systematic musicology-the anthropology of music (ethnomusicology), the sociology of music, the psychology of music, and the philosophy of music. Despite its borrowing from the social sciences and humanities...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (1): 13–35.
Published: 01 March 1994
... of the extraordinary realities experienced in music. Before developing these three themes, however, I will provide some definitions. By music I mean the humanly devised patterns of sounds, pitches, harmonies, rhythms, melodies, tone colors, and texts which any human society creates and employs, for whatever purposes...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1989) 3 (2): 75–84.
Published: 01 September 1989
... in suggesting that prayer plays a major role in the shaping of human affairs? After all, to criticize Stevie Wonder's message would also be to criticize those of us whose college- and young-adult years coincided with the period when Stevie Wonder broke ranks with the R&B strictures imposed upon him as a Motown...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1992) 6 (1): 68–97.
Published: 01 March 1992
... of the world" with one's perception of human existence. But absurdity in the blues is factual, not conceptual. The blues, while not denying that the world was strange, described its strangeness in more concrete and vivid terms. Freedom took on historical specificity when contrasted with legal servitude...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (1): 254–264.
Published: 01 March 1994
... issues which the songs in the album address have to do primarily with Christian anthropology. Christian anthropology has to do with, among other things, questions such as the following: What does it mean to be a human being in this quixotic world in which we live? What can I expect of myself? What can I...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (1): 135–156.
Published: 01 March 1994
... of the effort required to accomplish this, and yet without that divine spark, our human creative efforts are meaningless. No amount of craftsmanship can compensate for its lack." Only once before had Still given a detailed description of how inspiration actually felt to the composer. In a 1936 essay titled...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (1): 218–238.
Published: 01 March 1994
...-turn to rap music as "the last form of transcendence available." These young people are in search of the self-transcendence that is central to the human need for hope and survival, but they are not, in the main, reached by black religious organizations. Rather, they participate in the music and dance...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1992) 6 (1): 170–176.
Published: 01 March 1992
... of wolves. We further surmised that the first music to be performed by humans must have been a reproduction of the Earth's sounds (or something like them) for purposes of survival and celebration. In howling, we again sang the first song, or at least something like it. Perhaps our speculations were somewhat...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1990) 4 (2): 53–54.
Published: 01 September 1990
... could be pietistic in such poems as "A Hymn," and could poetically celebrate the spirituals, as he does "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot" in "When Malindy Sings." On the other hand, he could be pessimistic in such poems as "Religion" (80-81). In this piece he claims that human tears are more meaningful to him...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1989) 3 (2): 146–158.
Published: 01 September 1989
... that a Duke Divinity School scholar views the popular singer as a "preacher" of sorts with his own brand of theology. "People tend to think of Prince as the personification of human pornography, and yet his music also 1. Durham Morning Herald, March 4, 1989, 2C. 2. Duke Dialogue, March rn, 1989, r. 3...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1992) 6 (1): 162–169.
Published: 01 March 1992
... artists are by no means exceptions. Through prejudice jazz has been equated with rowdy, dirty, "devil music. 11 Yet jazz is an expression of a very sensitive human being. To call it rowdy, dirty music is to call Mary Lou, Duke, Ella, Bessie, Billie, Trane, Bird, etc., rowdy and dirty human beings...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1990) 4 (2): 54–58.
Published: 01 September 1990
... he claims that human tears are more meaningful to him than human prayers, and that human praxis in this world is more crucial than the human quest for personal salvation. Drawing on his sentiments regarding the failure of Reconstruction to realize improved racial relations and integration, Dunbar...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1992) 6 (1): 143–145.
Published: 01 March 1992
... Copyright © 1992 by Duke University Press 1992 Introduction Throughout America in the 1920s, debate raged regarding whether jazz could have degenerative effects on the human psyche. While some whites perceived jazz to be a neoteric, exotic, and erotic thing to be daringly experienced, 1...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (1): 205–217.
Published: 01 March 1994
..., is an instance of the discipline I have termed "theomusicology." Unlike ethnomusicology, whose practitioners view religion as a compartmentalized part of culture, theomusicologists view religion as all-pervasive in culture. We view religion as all-pervasive insofar as culture is created by human beings whom we...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1993) 7 (1): 62–70.
Published: 01 March 1993
... and military equipment in the midst of heavily populated areas with minimal human casualties. For some time now, we could destroy people without demolishing buildings and property. Now we can destroy buildings in the midst of people. We've studied war real well. Sermon presented on February 10, 1991...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1989) 3 (2): 125–132.
Published: 01 September 1989
... to no one. His erotic mysticism and prophetic vision have made him a figure firmly grounded in the history of black messiahs. Standing uniquely in the tradition of black radicalism and touching the sensibilities of today's youths when he calls for an assault on human misery, Prince has made votaries...