1-20 of 31 Search Results for

hip

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (1): 51–59.
Published: 01 March 1991
...Angela Spence Nelson Copyright © 1991 by Duke University Press 1991 Theology in the Hip-Hop ol Pub/it Enemy and Koo/Moe Dee Angela Spence Nelson The racial oppression of black people in many ways has fueled and shaped black musical forms in America. One example is the blues, which originated...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (1): 12–24.
Published: 01 March 1991
...Michael Eric Dyson Copyright © 1991 by Duke University Press 1991 Perlorman,e, Protest, and Prophety in the Culture ol Hip-Hop Michael Eric Dyson From the very beginning of its history, hip-hop music-or "rap," as it has come to be known-has faced various obstacles. Initially, rap was deemed...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (1): 25–40.
Published: 01 March 1991
... rhetorical trends within the hip-hop movement-the cultural context surrounding the creation of rap music: (1) a boogie-woogie hip-hop wave, (2) a rock 'n' roll hip-hop wave, and (3) a hard-core hiphop wave. Rap Music and tbe Boogie-Woogie Hip-Hop Wave Rap music began in the mid-seventies, in the South Bronx...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (2): 105–109.
Published: 01 September 1994
... position on the hip-hop crowd at this event seems clearly that of a spectator, although one with a particular capability to recognize the subversive potential of what he sees and hears. In his second chapter, "The Black Urban Beat: Rap and the Law," Baker offers a more focused and critically honed reading...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (1): 1–11.
Published: 01 March 1991
...-are not fundamentally different from the problems caused by apartheid in South Africa . In fact, Mandela has become a symbol of resistance to America's rapping 8. James Bernard, "The Rise of Rap: Reflections on the Growth of the Hip Hop Nation," African Commentary (June 1990): 50. 9. Frantz Fanon, The Wretched...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (1): 85–87.
Published: 01 March 1991
..., and Patty Romanowski . Fresh Hip-Hop Don't Stop. New York: Random House, 1985. Hager, Steven. Hip-Hop: Th e Illu strated History of Break Dancing, Rap Music, and Graffiti. New York: St. Martin 's, 1984. Toop, David. The Rap Attack: African five to New York Hip Hop. London: Pluto, 1984; Boston: South End...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1989) 3 (2): 142–145.
Published: 01 September 1989
..., and to the criticism it has evoked.I Rap, of course, is especially popular among urban black teenagers. With its staccato beats, its driving, lancing rhythms, and its hip lyrics, it reflects its origins in their world: a world that is increasingly an odyssey-through the terror of ghetto gangs, drugs, and racismin...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1990) 4 (2): 63–64.
Published: 01 September 1990
... communal standards, secular hedonism rather than sacred asceticism (125-26): Thus the covenant re-appeared in sixties rock 'n' roll as a secularized version of the Puritan obligation to self-examination: a hip covenant. Now, of course, the obligation involved sex, drugs, rock 'n' roll, and doing your own...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (1): 80–83.
Published: 01 March 1991
... the music so they got into the act, Came and killed off all the Injuns before they got hip to the fact That this cotton and tobacco did not intend to raise itself, So they put the Blacks in bondage and the Injuns on the shelf. Well, rap on, Brother! Well, that's the way it began. Rap right on, Brother! Said...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1992) 6 (1): 229–231.
Published: 01 March 1992
... rather than sacred asceticism.3 He says, "Thus the covenant reappeared in sixties rock 'n' roll as a secularized version of the Puritan obligation to self-examination: a hip covenant. Now, of course, the obligation involved sex, drugs, rock 'n' roll, and doing your own thing, not soul-searching."4...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (1): 60–67.
Published: 01 March 1991
... articulates the primacy of the mind by describing the relationship between the psychology and physiology of the transcendent experience: Music Feelings in the music Happy music Keeps me jumping to it Sound waves to my brain Connected to my heart I sing Electrify my hands and hips Motivate my feet to skip...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1990) 4 (1): 38.
Published: 01 March 1990
... a lowly human need. 2 Ah, what we can may not be much,Sympathy's soft, magnetic touch, Or kindly glance, or gentle word, Sent from a heart that love hath stirred. Yet down the years one deed will shine To say such service is divine. Words: Sara h Collins Fe rna ndis MI SS ION AND DI SC IPL ES HIP ...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (2): 99–104.
Published: 01 September 1994
...].ecting Black explores subjects from Christianity to neonationalism, from liberal theories of race to hip-hop culture, from Toni Morrison to Michael Jackson, and from Martin Luther King, Jr., to Leonard Jeffries. Dyson is among a few black critics breaking new ground, resisting racial essentialism at one...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (1): 205–217.
Published: 01 March 1994
... the secular exterior of popular music in order to uncover its interior religiosity. I will begin with the blues, the foundation of all American secular music, and proceed up to the current hip-hop era. Blues When the blues first began to develop as a commercial art form during the early r 920s, it was viewed...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (1): 64–77.
Published: 01 March 1994
... historically told them about black history.I? The hard-core rappers strongly advocate self-help and self-determi- 15. Ibid., 15-6. 16 . Kool Moe Dee, "Knowledge Is King." 17. Boogie Down Productions, "You Must Learn," Ghetto Music: The Blueprint of Hip Hop (Jive, n87-4-J, 1989). Tut, Tuture, and Context 69...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1995) 9 (1-2): 341–346.
Published: 01 September 1995
... candjo, 38; grapepick, 48; holy vs. sinful, 35-36; Jim Crow, 47; jitterbug, 44, 48; jook, 47; juba, 43, 47; jump, 48; peck, 48; pigeon wing, 47; rabbit, 47; shawobble, 48; shimmy, 48; shim-sham, 48; slowdrag, 47; snake hips, 48; truck, 48; zokie, 48. See ring shout, shout Daniels, Troup, 203 Davis...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (1): v–vii.
Published: 01 March 1991
... and scholars may not be entirely a one-way street: The poem "125th Street Rap Session," was written in 1967 by C. Eric Lincoln, the distinguished professor of religion at Duke University and one of my own most influential teachers . The youths of hip-hop culture might very well ask themselves : Where were...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1992) 6 (1): 143–145.
Published: 01 March 1992
... the music and the dance halls, cabarets, and underground taverns that helped scandalize the morals of black youths: "Our sedate young ladies . .. , tearing down every conceivable hope of redemption, abandon themselves into such frenzied, epileptic contortions as 'snake-hip,' 'black-bottom' and the vulgar...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1990) 4 (2): 61–63.
Published: 01 September 1990
...-examination: a hip covenant. Now, of course, the obligation involved sex, drugs, rock 'n' roll, and doing your own thing, not soul-searching. (r 27) Regarding Jimi Hendrix's dissonant guitar rendition of the "StarSpangled Banner" at the Woodstock festival, Curtis says, "The raw, ...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1993) 7 (1): 17–28.
Published: 01 March 1993
... of the violent, the chaotic, the uncontrolled, and the unconscious with the ordered, contained, conscious, and controlled conduit step. The secularization of the possession pattern can be observed in dances such as "the jerk," "the pop," "the snake hips," and "poplocking." Even in the secular dances...