1-20 of 144 Search Results for

community

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1990) 4 (2): 70–72.
Published: 01 September 1990
...Walter E. Fluker Fluker , Walter E. They Looked for a City: A Comparative Analysis of the Ideal of Community in the Thought of Howard Thurman and Martin Luther King, Jr. Lanham, Md. : University Press of America , 1989 . Copyright © 1990 by Duke University Press 1990 American...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1990) 4 (2): 86–88.
Published: 01 September 1990
...Robbie Lieberman Lieberman , Robbie . “My Song Is My Weapon”: People’s Songs, American Communism, and the Politics of Culture, 1930–1950 . Urbana : University of Illinois Press , 1989 . Copyright © 1990 by Duke University Press 1990 nition to the religion so that its members...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1990) 4 (2): 58–60.
Published: 01 September 1990
...James W. Button Button , James W. Blacks and Social Change: Impact of the Civil Rights Movement in Southern Communities . Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press , 1989 . Copyright © 1990 by Duke University Press 1990 Chatman's verses are made even more humorous...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (2): 1–29.
Published: 01 September 1994
.... African Christian music, from the emphatic introduction of the Western hymn by missionaries to new texts of African self-expressive praise, is in a dynamic transition. Today's African Christian communities are in the processes of redefining and rediscovering a transforming, if not emancipated, spiritual...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1990) 4 (2): 67–70.
Published: 01 September 1990
... for reasons of race, class, and gender. In substantial detail he cites scriptural evidence to show that the Old and New Testaments posit extensive mandates and standards for carrying out justice in the ancient Jewish communities and the early church. Afro-Christians have always underscored these passages...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (1): 12–24.
Published: 01 March 1991
... the social and communal fabric of already debased black inner cities across America: Well today's topic is self-destruction It really ain't the rap audience that's buggin' It's one or two suckers, ignorant brothers Tryin' to rob and steal from one another 16 Bladt Sacred Music 'Cause the way we live...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (2): 124–128.
Published: 01 September 1994
... to complement that of Thurman: Thurman sought through the black community the universality of religion; Cone seeks the universality of Book Reviews 125 Christian faith in the black community as it engages in the struggle for liberation. This dialectic of particularity and universality is picked up by Alonzo...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (1): 3–12.
Published: 01 March 1994
... one tries unwittingly to avoid it, think what would happen were one to state it openly as the theme! In this essay I shall resist the temptation to explain why each of the papers at the Cornell conference actually addressed religious music, although music as a coextensive agent for religion, community...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1990) 4 (2): 30–34.
Published: 01 September 1990
... with other tongues" (glossolalia) .2 In addition to expecting new members to be Spirit-baptized, the established Pentecostal community maintains a strict code of personal conduct. One of the traditional ways black Pentecostals communicate this expectation to new members is through their praise songs. New...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (1): 60–67.
Published: 01 March 1991
... to persuade Eshu Elegba to open new doors and guide us through the crossroads that mark the growth of consciousness. In this respect, Eshu Elegba performs the same service throughout the West African diaspora as in the pantheons and cultic life of traditional West African communities. Black Sacred Musi c 5:1...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1993) 7 (1): 80–82.
Published: 01 March 1993
... point of his analysis, rehearsing the rites and themes of African American Christianity. He places primary emphasis on the African influence on black religion in the United States and the church's role in community leadership. Walker continues the emphasis on community leadership, noting the church's...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (1): 218–238.
Published: 01 March 1994
... youths have not found this source of spirituality to be a means for self and community development. If West is correct in his assessment that rap music provides the primary (albeit truncated) mode of spirituality available to black youth, then the church needs to give serious attention to the art form...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1991) 5 (1): 25–40.
Published: 01 March 1991
..., the artful use of words has evolved into a variety of speech genres within the African-American community. These genres include the creation of plantation tales, work songs, and unique preaching styles; the telling of rhyming jokes, riddles, singing games, and jump-rope rhymes; and the use of more creative...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1990) 4 (2): 97–100.
Published: 01 September 1990
... between the American promise and national reality widened, the literary tendency to include a moral thrust rooted in Christian biblicism persisted (64). There was also a tendency among the oppressed to communicate in coded language (masking) in a way not too different from that found in the antebellum...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (1): 92–106.
Published: 01 March 1994
... to engage in interdisciplinary dialogue, especially with cultural and communication sciences. However, there can be no objectivity as in the natural sciences. The bottom line of ethical considerations cannot and must not be a definitive verdict on the value of popular culture for all people of all times...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1992) 6 (1): 36–46.
Published: 01 March 1992
... trou- badours were singing them in dance halls, cotton fields, whore- Ethos of the Blues 41 houses, turpentine camps, and barrooms. The country blues singers were already stamped in the eyes of the black community as men of sin. Many Negro ministers warned their congregations against associating...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1992) 6 (1): 68–97.
Published: 01 March 1992
... "priests" of the community began to emerge alongside of the preachers and deacons; and other songs were sung in addition to the spirituals. The "new priests" of the black community were the bluesmen and women, and their songs were the blues. Like the preacher in the church, they proclaimed the Word...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1994) 8 (1): 13–35.
Published: 01 March 1994
...-worship, entertainment, communication, pleasure, amusement, comfort, and so forth. Religious or sacred music, defined by its use in worship or the religious content of its texts, will Clyde J. Steckel is Driscoll Senior Professor of theology at United Theological Semi- nary of the Twin Cities, New...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1989) 3 (2): 1–16.
Published: 01 September 1989
... and community-principally incorporating methods borrowed from anthropology, sociology, psychology, and philosophy. ffleomusicology and s«11l11r ffleology It is quite natural for theomusicology to examine sacred music insofar as it is clearly theological. However, it is not the sacred music of the Church...
Journal Article
Black Sacred Music (1988) 2 (1): 21–34.
Published: 01 March 1988
...William C. Turner, Jr. © Copyright 1988 JBSM /Jon Michael Spencer 1988 The Musicality of Black Preaching: A Phenomenology William C. Turner, Jr. The Pervasiveness of the Idiom One who observes the Black Church from within the context of its life as a worshiping community is soon struck...