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monk

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Image
Published: 01 October 2019
Figure 13. Caṅkrama image of Vārāṇasī (rear view), a gift of the monk Bala with the nun Buddhamitrā, dated to ke 3 (130 ce ). H. 287 cm. Sarnath Museum (356, formerly Si. B.1). From Oertel, “Excavations at Sārnāth,” pl. 26b. More
Image
Published: 01 October 2019
Figure 14. Caṅkrama image of Śrāvastī, a gift of the monk Bala. H. 248 cm. Indian Museum (A25028). Photograph: Wikimedia Commons. More
Image
Published: 01 October 2019
Figure 18. Āyāgapaṭa from Ghoṣitārāma, a gift of the monk Phagula, first century ce . H. 55.8 cm (extant). G. R. Sharma Memorial Museum, University of Allahabad. After Ghosh, “Buddhist Inscription from Kausambi,” fig. c. More
Image
Published: 01 October 2020
Figure 11. Lay sponsor figures behind monk with ritual offerings; detail of lower right of Figure 10. More
Image
Published: 01 October 2020
Figure 12. Sponsor-couple with child seated behind monk or nun with offerings; detail at the lower left of an Amitāyus thangka of ca. sixteenth century; village shrine in Hankar, Markha Valley, Ladakh. Photograph: Rob Linrothe, 2012. More
Image
Published: 01 April 2017
Figure 14. Monks and laymen , mid-1st century bce . Kanaganahalli, India. Photograph: author. More
Image
Published: 01 April 2017
Figure 16. Monks receiving a gift from a king , mid-1st century bce . Kanaganahalli, India. Photograph: author. More
Journal Article
Archives of Asian Art (2023) 73 (1): 25–54.
Published: 01 April 2023
...Steffani Bennett Abstract The monk-painter Sesshū Tōyō (1420–ca. 1506) is among the most heralded of Japanese artists. This reputation is due in large part to his heroization in art-historical texts of the early modern period. Earlier scholarly emphasis on Sesshū's artistic individualism has...
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Journal Article
Archives of Asian Art (2019) 69 (1): 1–19.
Published: 01 April 2019
... as guardians and occasionally have been linked to nearby water systems, such as ponds, tanks, and rivers. Yet, these images have not been studied as an aspect of water regulation within the monasteries themselves. This paper will first consider the water-related challenges that confronted the monks...
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Journal Article
Archives of Asian Art (2023) 73 (2): 107–143.
Published: 01 October 2023
... is further supported by an original translation of an excerpt from Siddhicandra's (d. ca. 1666) Bhānucandragaṇicarita , a Sanskrit text composed by a Jain monk at the Mughal court. Ultimately, this study contributes to critical discourses on iconoclasm, artistic agency, Mughal-Jain relations, and historical...
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Journal Article
Archives of Asian Art (2013) 63 (1): 59–86.
Published: 01 April 2013
... of the local monks with were gradually lost. In earlier times, the center benefited firsthand knowledge of the events that the applique´, from the fresh influx of developments at the fringes. In some 212 centimeters high including the mounting, later times, the benefits that returned were not without had been...
Journal Article
Archives of Asian Art (2006) 56 (1): 61–80.
Published: 01 April 2006
... figures of monks stretching along its back and side walls the reign of Empress Wu (684.-7o5). The largest of those, the (Figs. 2, 3).1 Above these figures the walls are patterned with cave-temple Kanjingsi, is approximately IT meters square and remnants of multiple small seated-Buddha images...
Journal Article
Archives of Asian Art (2005) 55 (1): 1–15.
Published: 01 April 2005
... of Mahasthamaprapta, who usually accompanies Amitabha and Avalokitesvara in the triad iconography, by the bodhisattva Ksitigarbha in the form of a monk. The triad with Ksitigarbha seems to be unique to Kory6 Buddhist painting. Bodhisattva Ksitigarbha is characterized by his compas- sion for condemned souls...
Journal Article
Archives of Asian Art (2019) 69 (2): 217–242.
Published: 01 October 2019
... form, tellingly suggests that the stone pedestal was made and used at T'ongdosa, the original location of the pedestal is still uncertain. 47 I suspect that the pedestal was reused, like spolia. 48 In other words, we can understand that the nineteenth-century monks of T'ongdosa took advantage...
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Journal Article
Archives of Asian Art (2016) 66 (1): 107–151.
Published: 01 April 2016
... Buddha’s monk disciple, is lured by a prostitute, Ma¯tan˙gı¯ to more than half of all commentaries on the S´ u¯ ramgama (Modengqienu and nearly breaks the rule Sutra produced since its appearance.9 While social,˙ eco- of pure living. The Buddha proclaims the S´ u¯ ramgama- nomic, and cultural...
Journal Article
Archives of Asian Art (2019) 69 (1): 21–53.
Published: 01 April 2019
... frontal pose. The inclusion of sculptures of each king leaves no doubt that the monk or patron who designed the hall understood the role of these figures as judges and rulers in the land of the dead. The emphasis placed on Enma also suggests that the person or group who constructed the hall employed...
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Journal Article
Archives of Asian Art (2010) 60 (1): 43–78.
Published: 01 April 2010
... undertaking begun by the monk Jingwan was without a doubt the centerpiece both conceptually sometime in the Daye reign (605–617) of the Sui and physically. As the first of the nine cave-chambers dynasty, which was continued by five generations of to be built, it was assigned a prominent position atop his...
Journal Article
Archives of Asian Art (2017) 67 (1): 111–142.
Published: 01 April 2017
...Figure 14. Monks and laymen , mid-1st century bce . Kanaganahalli, India. Photograph: author. ...
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Journal Article
Archives of Asian Art (2006) 56 (1): 11–30.
Published: 01 April 2006
..., with apsarases and Spirit Kings (shen wang) on the wall surfaces above and below the niches. Among the Spirit Kings at the bottom of the central pillar are a number of monks...
Journal Article
Archives of Asian Art (2014) 64 (2): 119–163.
Published: 01 October 2014
... to the perspective of the viewer. These subsidiary statuettes can be categorized into five For example, the attending figures, South-2 through -5, figure types: bodhisattvas, monks, male attendants, female South-11 and -12, in the Maitreya tableau still have attendants, and heavenly kings (Fig. 11).10 The figurines...