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sutpen

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Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2005) 77 (3): 483–509.
Published: 01 September 2005
... and content and must be accounted for alongside questions of race, culture, and capi- talism, the more traditional emphases of socially engaged criticism on Faulkner’s work.5 This earlier criticism has focused on the novel’s most signifying character, Thomas Sutpen, read (by Carolyn Porter, for...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2004) 76 (2): 339–366.
Published: 01 June 2004
... seeking clues in her story itself. Chronologi- cally, it begins in the early nineteenth century with Thomas Sutpen and his rise from poor mountain boy to rich and feared Mississippi plantation owner. Sutpen married Miss Rosa’s older sister and had two children by that marriage, Henry and Judith. In...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2001) 73 (3): 563–597.
Published: 01 September 2001
... asserts her belief in the ‘‘might-have-been which is more true than truth’’ (118) and refers to herself as ‘‘I the dreamer’’ (116) and ‘‘I [who] dwelt in the dream’’ (122). In the illusory, mythical world that enthralls her, Confederate soldiers appear as larger-than-life heroes; Thomas Sutpen, as...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2007) 79 (1): 85–112.
Published: 01 March 2007
... are few certainties about Bon’s silent mistress; unlike the “unnamed infant” of Sutpen and Milly Jones, she is not given a separate entry in the novel’s genealogy. She is referred to merely as “an octoroon mistress” in the entry for her child—the “an” robbing her of both...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2006) 78 (4): 769–798.
Published: 01 December 2006
..., she watched her mother nurse Sutpen’s white children, Judith and Henry? What would this have been like for their white mother, Ellen Coldfield? Suddenly huge spots of vacancy or indeterminacy open in Faulkner’s story—his plenitude hovering over an abyss of unsaid connections and deprivations...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2008) 80 (1): 111–140.
Published: 01 March 2008
... resistant script into the fabric of his novel would entail giving expression and form to the silenced or inarticulate voices of Sutpen’s black progeny. Paredes’s awareness of the inadequacy of the bildungsroman to encapsulate peripheral modes of subject formation brings him closer to...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2010) 82 (2): 421–422.
Published: 01 June 2010
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2010) 82 (2): 423–425.
Published: 01 June 2010
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2010) 82 (2): 425–427.
Published: 01 June 2010
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American Literature (1 June 2010) 82 (2): 427–429.
Published: 01 June 2010
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2010) 82 (2): 430–432.
Published: 01 June 2010
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2010) 82 (2): 432–434.
Published: 01 June 2010
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2010) 82 (2): 434–436.
Published: 01 June 2010
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2010) 82 (2): 436–438.
Published: 01 June 2010
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2010) 82 (2): 439–441.
Published: 01 June 2010
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2010) 82 (2): 441–443.
Published: 01 June 2010
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American Literature (1 June 2010) 82 (2): 443–447.
Published: 01 June 2010
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2010) 82 (2): 447–449.
Published: 01 June 2010
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2004) 76 (1): 177–179.
Published: 01 March 2004
... portrayal of the black children of Henry Sutpen, Carothers McCaslin, and John Sartoris. While Railey succeeds in delineating the contours of what one might call Faulkner’s ‘‘plantation com- plex he doesn’t probe its implications for Faulkner’s own family life or for the fictional family systems he...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2004) 76 (1): 179–182.
Published: 01 March 2004
... Faulkner’s great-grandfather’s black family, which surely influenced Faulkner’s portrayal of the black children of Henry Sutpen, Carothers McCaslin, and John Sartoris. While Railey succeeds in delineating the contours of what one might call Faulkner’s ‘‘plantation com- plex he doesn’t probe its...