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snake

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Published: 01 March 2020
Figure 5 Carver’s second drawing of the Buffeloe Snake. The caption reads, “The Buffeloe Snake Seen towards the South Sea, by the Naudowessie, Esteem’d by them a God.” © British Library Board (Add. MS 8950 f170r) Figure 5 Carver’s second drawing of the Buffeloe Snake. The caption reads More
Journal Article
American Literature (2010) 82 (4): 807–834.
Published: 01 December 2010
... literary resurrection of a destroyed snake effigy mound once central to the Blood Run earthworks site, located on what is now the Iowa-South Dakota border, which she performs by citing the terrestrial form and celestial alignments of the majestic Serpent Mound extant in southern Ohio. Analysis...
Journal Article
American Literature (2017) 89 (4): 761–789.
Published: 01 December 2017
..., reflecting a larger tendency in nuclear criticism to magnify the conditions of the atom bomb’s detonations in wartime or an imagined future over those of its production and disposal. Containing Almanac ’s spectacular array of temporalities, however, is a very simple story: a giant stone snake emerges next...
Journal Article
American Literature (2020) 92 (1): 1–31.
Published: 01 March 2020
...Figure 5 Carver’s second drawing of the Buffeloe Snake. The caption reads, “The Buffeloe Snake Seen towards the South Sea, by the Naudowessie, Esteem’d by them a God.” © British Library Board (Add. MS 8950 f170r) Figure 5 Carver’s second drawing of the Buffeloe Snake. The caption reads...
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Journal Article
American Literature (2021) 93 (3): 473–496.
Published: 01 September 2021
... of sinking land, asserting a liveliness of environmental matter and, as Susan Leigh Star ( 1999 : 377) puts it, “restor[ing] narrative to what appears to be dead”—the ground. Land is actively swallowed by the storm-snake in the moment of the hurricane and consistently unstable throughout the narrative...
Journal Article
American Literature (2000) 72 (4): 882–883.
Published: 01 December 2000
... Chapter 2, on ‘‘Billie Potts’’ and Brother to Drag- ons, delivers some insights—by comparing, for example, the Ancient Mariner blessing the ‘‘foul sea-snakes’’ to Warren finding the mud-slimed Mississippi catfish...
Journal Article
American Literature (2000) 72 (4): 883–884.
Published: 01 December 2000
... realized Romantic vision Chapter 2, on ‘‘Billie Potts’’ and Brother to Drag- ons, delivers some insights—by comparing, for example, the Ancient Mariner blessing the ‘‘foul sea-snakes’’ to Warren finding the mud-slimed Mississippi...
Journal Article
American Literature (2003) 75 (4): 783–811.
Published: 01 December 2003
...- rogative to make Types35 There is ‘‘Scripture ground for example, for the idea that the crucifixion was prefigured in the bronze snake, but there is no scriptural ground for the claim that the ‘‘clean’’ animals in an Old...
Journal Article
American Literature (2014) 86 (2): 217–243.
Published: 01 June 2014
..., 232  American Literature resided at the fort Onondaga; his head and body was ornamented with black snakes . . . after a while he requested the people to change his dress, the people immediately drove away the snakes— a mass of wampam were collected and the chief was soon dressed...
Journal Article
American Literature (2002) 74 (4): 715–745.
Published: 01 December 2002
..., and as such they crystallize problems that emerge from the juncture of art and the nervous system. Elsie Venner, whose nervous system was poisoned by snake venom while she was American Realism and Nervous ‘‘Reflexion’’ 725 still in utero, cannot sing, or play music, or even give articulate voice...
Journal Article
American Literature (2020) 92 (4): 737–743.
Published: 01 December 2020
... for their own perceptions of their bodies and the environment (Wald 2008 : 70). If American individualism is currently poised—in part as an ironic result of American neoliberal individualization of healthcare mandates as seen in Mallon’s example—to become a snake eating its tail, it is not just because...
Journal Article
American Literature (2002) 74 (1): 59–87.
Published: 01 March 2002
..., Henry does sprinkle superficial allusions to the expedition throughout the story. Not only does Locks- ley refer to his various ‘‘explorations but when Miriam announces, ‘‘I’m so afraid of the snakes! If you hear a scream you may know it’s a snake he jests: ‘‘Screaming snakesthat’sanewspecies’’ L-P...
Journal Article
American Literature (2018) 90 (2): 283–313.
Published: 01 June 2018
..., the narrator, too, becomes a decentered subject of father-daughter abuse and recounts her favorite childhood tale. After explaining a transgendered childhood upbringing and making reference to the abuse, the narrator turns to a childhood story: a girl’s heterosexual desire for a boy who plays with snakes...
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Journal Article
American Literature (2018) 90 (3): 495–522.
Published: 01 September 2018
... to rain heavily as she finds “herself penetrating deeper and deeper into the forest.” She falls into a “morass,” and as she becomes more lost, she encounters a “huge black snake” (Chesnutt 2014 , 182). Triangulated by men who stand in for racial ideologies and their patriarchal conditions, Rena chooses...
Journal Article
American Literature (2012) 84 (3): 589–615.
Published: 01 September 2012
... Montreal pronunciation, “Docteur Sax” is how one says “Dr. Sex.” The novel sets the hero in opposition to the embodiment of evil, the Great Snake of the World who coils in the ground beneath Lowell; this libidinal monster, initially poised to burst forth into a frenzy of destruction...
Journal Article
American Literature (2009) 81 (1): 127–152.
Published: 01 March 2009
... to eat our own flesh;— now we were contending with the waves, and were drowned;—now we were overtaken, and torn to pieces by the fangs of the terrible bloodhound. We were stung by scorpions, chased by wild beasts, bitten by snakes, and finally, after having nearly reached the desired...
Journal Article
American Literature (2005) 77 (2): 259–289.
Published: 01 June 2005
... literally promotes himself. Indeed, the assembly of Smith’s prosthetic body at the end of the tale becomes a grotesque ‘‘campaign’’ in self-advertisement as he displays each of his appendages with the unctuous courtesy of a peddler selling ‘‘Kickapoo’’ snake oil.43 For example, speaking...
Journal Article
American Literature (2011) 83 (2): 251–278.
Published: 01 June 2011
... disorients the reader. The descrip- tor “coffee” mingles with the fact that prior to this description there is a lot of coffee drinking going on. “Blacksnake” uses the word “black” not to describe color but to name a type of snake and then to describe the physical characteristics of an arm. “White...
Journal Article
American Literature (2009) 81 (4): 687–717.
Published: 01 December 2009
... haunting scene of vagabondage or “tramping,” which occurs during the last night Huck spends with his drunk, abusive father. Shortly after Pap’s tirades against the “govment” that would entitle a “free nigger” to education and suffrage, he has nightmares about snakes and tramps...
Journal Article
American Literature (2002) 74 (3): 455–483.
Published: 01 September 2002
... of her husband, Sykes, who does not work and resents Delia for doing the laundry of white people for pay. Aware of his wife’s fear of snakes, he brings home a rattlesnake to torment her. But the snake ends up biting and killing Sykes instead, and Delia watches as her husband slowly dies. The story...