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Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2001) 73 (3): 563–597.
Published: 01 September 2001
... elsewhere: an imaginary slightly detached, this is what I demand of the film.—Roland Barthes, ‘‘Upon LeavingtheMovieTheatre’’ In the middle of narrating her chapter of Absalom, Absalom!, Rosa Coldfield describes herself watching the ‘‘miragy an- tics of men...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2004) 76 (2): 339–366.
Published: 01 June 2004
... in the United States As Morrison attests, there is no ‘‘romance free of what Herman Melville called ‘the power of blackness 2 And there is none free of homoerotic desire. Absalom opens with the insistent evocation of a question: Why does Miss Rosa choose Quentin to hear the history she tells...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2003) 75 (4): 813–841.
Published: 01 December 2003
... Royal is raising his daughters sequestered in a garden-like home. Raced as white, Rosa and Flora do not know they are their father’s property until Royal dies suddenly with his estate near bankruptcy. Still in shock from...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2000) 72 (4): 889–890.
Published: 01 December 2000
... their earlier lives. Authors of a fourth pair of novels (Helen Baro- lini’s Umbertina and Tina De Rosa’s Paper Fish) focus on the stories of grand- mothers. Here authors recover their Italian roots while achieving autonomy...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2005) 77 (3): 483–509.
Published: 01 September 2005
... direct us, through Faulkner and the Postcolonial 491 Rosa Coldfield’s dialogue, to the South’s fractured history and resul- tant economic dependency on the North for an answer: ‘‘Because you are going away to attend the college at Harvard they tell me she said...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2015) 87 (3): 614–616.
Published: 01 September 2015
... remains absolutely critical. In Black Internationalist Feminism, Higashida profiles the role of black internationalist feminism in the life and work of black women writers such as Lorraine Hansberry, Alice Childress, Rosa Guy, Audre Lorde, and Maya ...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2015) 87 (3): 616–618.
Published: 01 September 2015
... of black internationalist feminism in the life and work of black women writers such as Lorraine Hansberry, Alice Childress, Rosa Guy, Audre Lorde, and Maya Book Reviews  617 Angelou, inviting readers to consider how a commitment to...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2005) 77 (4): 873–881.
Published: 01 December 2005
.... Anthologies Into the Mouths of Babes: An Anthology of Children’s Abolitionist Literature. Ed. Debo- rah C. De Rosa. Westport, Conn.: Praeger. 2005. xix, 390 pp. $89.95. Lacking safe public platforms for voicing abolitionist views, nineteenth- century American women authors used the socially acceptable...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2018) 90 (1): 1–26.
Published: 01 March 2018
... producer Townsend are bestowed a well-deserved nod in Deborah De Rosa’s Domestic Abolitionism and Juvenile Literature, 1830–1865 ( 2003 ). De Rosa argues that their writings evidence a domestic abolitionist literature that nineteenth-century women developed in order to transcend gendered public and...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2003) 75 (4): 892–895.
Published: 01 December 2003
...- ings of Helen Barolini’s Umbertina and Tina De Rosa’s Paper Fishur-texts’’ 6986 AMERICAN LITERATURE / 75:4 / sheet 205 of 255 that portray an Italian American womanhood more ambivalent, complicated, and political than often recognized. Subsequent topics, including...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2004) 76 (2): 221–246.
Published: 01 June 2004
... determine the fate of slavery within its borders, the popular carte de visite ‘‘Rosa, Charley, and Rebecca: Slave Children from New Orleans’’ (1864) used the child to raise the same question: How can a nation that is, as Lincoln asserts in the Gettys- burg Address, ‘‘conceived in Liberty, and dedicated...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2001) 73 (1): 221–228.
Published: 01 March 2001
... Rosa A. Eberly. Urbana: Univ. of Illinois Press. 2000. xvii, 199 pp. Paper, $14.95. Working from Jürgen Habermas’s notion of ‘‘public spheres in worlds of let- ters Eberly analyzes the public responses to four controversial texts: James Joyce’s Ulysses, Henry Miller’s Tropic of Cancer, Bret Easton...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2007) 79 (1): 143–175.
Published: 01 March 2007
... Wheeler's Source Codes  145 and the clock. Rather than scolding, their mother tells Elinor how much fun she’d have with a little girl who simply couldn’t keep out of mischief and whose exploits would be truly “interesting.” Wheeler’s excerpt reads: “. . . Elinor dragged Rosa [the...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2019) 91 (2): 263–293.
Published: 01 June 2019
... and glances, to perceive that the coral circulating within the narrative is more than merely ornamental to people across the color spectrum. “Quadroons” Rosa and Jane each own a “pair of coral ear-drops” (2010, 196), which signify their position in “the higher circle” (217) of enslaved people at the...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2000) 72 (4): 783–812.
Published: 01 December 2000
... representative of the diplomatic world at Rosa de Fitz-James’s, ‘‘Maurice Paléologue, who, after filling important posts at the Foreign Office, was to be the last French Ambassador at St. Petersburg before the war’’ (BG, 270...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2018) 90 (1): 141–170.
Published: 01 March 2018
... mobility through marriage must be understood in the context of her constrained circumstances. Esperanza’s narration consistently attends to the constraints other women face. She tells the story of Rosa Vargas, a poor single mother trying to raise a large family. Esperanza insists, “It’s not her fault you...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2006) 78 (2): 357–387.
Published: 01 June 2006
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2004) 76 (3): 549–577.
Published: 01 September 2004
... historically significant act before returning to their lives outside the frame of official history. The participants’ ordinariness is meant to connect with the visitor, to enlist an identification that will transcend the temporal rift. Strangely but significantly, all the figures—the bus driver, Rosa Parks, the...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2017) 89 (2): 331–354.
Published: 01 June 2017
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2010) 82 (2): 361–388.
Published: 01 June 2010