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patient narrative

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Journal Article
American Literature (2024) 96 (2): 241–267.
Published: 01 June 2024
... system. However, the protagonist’s corporeal development of a new consciousness through racist injury has unintended consequences; his resilient brain charts new pathways of thought, undermining his domination through emotional self-awareness. This essay argues that the protagonist’s patient narrative...
Journal Article
American Literature (2020) 92 (4): 707–722.
Published: 01 December 2020
... techniques, including microscopic images of the virus, close-ups of disease vectors, global and local maps of contagion, health workers in biohazard suits, and visibly ill patients. The essay argues that techniques for visualizing the invisible produce a narrative logic of causality in COVID-19...
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Journal Article
American Literature (2024) 96 (2): 163–185.
Published: 01 June 2024
...). Altogether, what emerges is an ongoing willingness to dismiss minoritized patient narratives as illegitimate on the basis of their being invented, unreliable, fake, or imagined. The story of the heart constitutes a response to the idea of invented pain. The charge of fakery in these examples follow from...
Journal Article
American Literature (2016) 88 (2): 331–360.
Published: 01 June 2016
... disavowing the war effort altogether as psychologically devastating. While between the wars psychiatrists had been developing lengthy forms of psychotherapy (including psychoanalysis) that focused primarily on coaxing patient narratives to emerge (Shorter 1997 , 160–65, 231–33), with the beginning...
Journal Article
American Literature (2024) 96 (2): 141–162.
Published: 01 June 2024
... the 2020 definition of pain into practice, Kathleen A. Sluka and Steven Z. George highlight the multiscalar nature of pain as key to clinical application in the practice of their own fields of physical therapy and rehabilitation science to improve patient care. As they write, the new insistence that pain...
Journal Article
American Literature (2024) 96 (2): 187–212.
Published: 01 June 2024
... narratives can heighten providers’ observational skills, since readers must observe visual cues in order to supplement the written text provided. Health humanities scholars have proposed that in addition to enhancing clinicians’ ability to observe their patients’ experiences of pain, studying the visual...
Journal Article
American Literature (2021) 93 (4): 629–654.
Published: 01 December 2021
... indictment of the post–World War II US health care system. According to Times journalist Matthew Haag ( 2017 ), Chandler’s story “could pass as modern fiction, offering sharp criticism about a health care system chasing higher profits and patients who cannot afford treatment.” The managing editor...
Journal Article
American Literature (2005) 77 (4): 815–845.
Published: 01 December 2005
... against the politi- cal and narrative deviance of the nomadic, queer body. This is not to suggest that there is some transhistorical form of Filippino political resistance; historically the nomad and the bandit have not shared the same political goals. More important, they are not even necessarily...
Journal Article
American Literature (2024) 96 (2): 297–324.
Published: 01 June 2024
... narrative texts and their film adaptations suggests that the oculocentrism of such accounts has elided the significant role of sound, both verbal and nonverbal, in the expression and witnessing of physical pain. Instances of what was classified in the nineteenth century as sensation literature, these three...
Journal Article
American Literature (2019) 91 (3): 666–668.
Published: 01 September 2019
...). In sum, Diedrich explores the possibility of a different story to tell about medicine: one of the generalist instead of the specialist, of the fraught and peculiar narratives of patients rather than the seemingly clean and tidy narratives of specialist practitioners. This premise could have been...
Journal Article
American Literature (2014) 86 (3): 583–610.
Published: 01 September 2014
... of Medical Professionalism  585 ments in most states, which, in effect, allowed virtually any untrained amateur or straight-out quack to call him- or herself a medical doctor and begin charging patients.1 Published two years after its author’s nose surgery, Herrick’s novel The Web of Life (1900...
Journal Article
American Literature (2007) 79 (3): 577–603.
Published: 01 September 2007
..., Freud makes the crucial distinction between remembering and repeating. When a patient “remembers” an event, he gives a straightforward narrative account of it.9 When a patient “repeats” an event, by contrast, he does not tell it but shows it: “[W]e may say that the patient does not remember...
Journal Article
American Literature (2008) 80 (3): 527–554.
Published: 01 September 2008
... of the nineteenth century to the drug memoirs and confessions of the early twentieth century, lurid scenes, such as this one from Edward Payson Roe’s bestselling 1881 novel Without a Home, characterize addiction narratives. In what David Rey- nolds has described as the “dark temperance” subgenre...
Journal Article
American Literature (2004) 76 (4): 889–891.
Published: 01 December 2004
..., ‘‘unwritten’’ but, rather, relentlessly rewritten. The alternating images of ‘‘dis- ciplined troops’’ and ‘‘panting rabble’’ characterize the narratives she exam- ines, as wartime and postbellum writers alike revisit the scenes of carnage 890 American Literature to remark on the incoherence...
Journal Article
American Literature (2020) 92 (4): 737–743.
Published: 01 December 2020
... factoring into these rights. The healthy carrier narrative makes this abundantly clear, and this narrative offers a potential means of bridging gaps between ethical obligations on one hand and effective public health communication on the other. Although the novel coronavirus is more frequently framed...
Journal Article
American Literature (2019) 91 (2): 438–446.
Published: 01 June 2019
... the question of agency within the context of diabetes and the intricate network of health care systems. To do so, Arduser enlists interdisciplinary concepts—such as plasticity, liminality, and multiplicity—and an analysis of interviews with medical providers and patients living with diabetes. The book advances...
Journal Article
American Literature (2021) 93 (3): 497–523.
Published: 01 September 2021
... infrastructures intensify racial inequality under terms that do not include race at all. Through a reading of Chang-rae Lee’s On Such a Full Sea (2014) and other texts, the article develops the term studious deracination to refer to a narrative strategy defined by an evacuated racial consciousness that is used...
Journal Article
American Literature (2004) 76 (4): 891–894.
Published: 01 December 2004
... for experimentation with gentler, unortho- dox treatments. As Twain pursued one new remedy after another, he learned that even if the science does not help the disease, the hope it offers may help the patient—an insight, Ober argues, still useful to doctors and patients today. Ober’s touching account...
Journal Article
American Literature (2011) 83 (2): 413–441.
Published: 01 June 2011
... in tension with both inherited and environmental determinants. Ultimately, Hamner's essay shows that beneath questions about genomic identity lie even more profound ones about the nature and purposes of narrative. © 2011 by Duke University Press 2011 Everett The Predisposed Agency of Genomic...
Journal Article
American Literature (2008) 80 (3): 583–609.
Published: 01 September 2008
.... The voice is the voice of a talk- ing book.”1 If the book talks and the reader listens, then Morrison offers a transferential relation that allows us to place text and reader, in Jonathan Culler’s terms, “in the positions, respectively, of patient and analyst.”2 And a much “regressed...