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nervous

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Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2002) 74 (4): 715–745.
Published: 01 December 2002
... mimeses are natural responses of the nervous system. But in states of ‘‘general nervousness or in hysteria, ‘‘the qualities which we all possess are apt to take on a morbid develop- ment, and to get out of the limits of rational control’’ MD 57). First, that is, there is a morbid oversensitivity...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2013) 85 (3): 419–445.
Published: 01 September 2013
... be human flowed from having the right kind of nervous sensitivity, being called insensible—sensorially deficient— was a serious charge: it meant having one’s experiences discarded as fantasy or blankness. Treating insensible somnambulists as epistemically valuable rebuts the charge of blankness that...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2008) 80 (3): 527–554.
Published: 01 September 2008
... time, the temperance plot was updated to include the idea that such habituations might be nervous illnesses afflicting modern professional workers. Through its addicted protagonist Martin Jocelyn, Roe's novel engages these unevenly developing medical, reform, and popular early representations of...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2014) 86 (4): 833–835.
Published: 01 December 2014
... discourses of the nervous system in nineteenth-century medicine and literature, one might initially puzzle over her decision to name her book The Politics of Anxiety rather than The Poli- tics of Nervousness, but anxiety turns out to be central to Murison’s history both of neurology and of literary...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2014) 86 (4): 831–833.
Published: 01 December 2014
... production and its status in critical methodology than Murison’s The Politics of Anxiety in Nineteenth-Century American Literature and Williams’s Dividing Lines. Given Murison’s focus on discourses of the nervous system in nineteenth-century medicine and literature, one might initially puzzle over...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2011) 83 (4): 889–891.
Published: 01 December 2011
... psychoanalysis without “women’s diseases” like hysteria or nervous disor- ders. Female sexuality and reproduction have historically been monitored by a male medical and psychoanalytic profession. Building design, fashion, and juridical definitions of identity have reinforced the idea that, as Iris...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2003) 75 (2): 436–437.
Published: 01 June 2003
... Chaney? For Flora wanting her son to go to work at the age of ten only to help his ‘‘nervous tics For Jack’s screaming, ‘‘Let it die! Let it die following the birth of his daughter Joan, her head tempo- rarily...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2003) 75 (2): 440–442.
Published: 01 June 2003
... Harold Monro (1879–1932). According to Hibberd, Monro was an unhappily married (twice), closeted homosexual who suffered from bad eyesight, poor digestion, nervous breakdowns, and bouts of alcohol-induced amnesia...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2004) 76 (4): 889–891.
Published: 01 December 2004
...- tated bodies. Long’s approach is most effective when she discusses writers who explic- itly connected bodily wounds with cultural conditions or practices, as she does beautifully in her account of S. Weir Mitchell, who initially practiced his rest cure on nervous Civil War soldiers. Mitchell...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2016) 88 (2): 269–300.
Published: 01 June 2016
... wire may not be communicated to the brain?” (493). 24 Indeed, science writers of the time seem to second these claims, arguing that the transmission of the nerves in the human body presents “a very curious analogy to a telegraphic wire,” and “groups of [nervous] cells evidently answer to the...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2004) 76 (3): 467–494.
Published: 01 September 2004
... romantic and mainstream thought from the 1830s to the 1850s, long-standing ideas of electricity as related to the nervous impulse—a divine, nearly immaterial spark of life—and to thought itself were reconceived in terms of Morse’s telegraph. In turn, through the telegraph, American romantics...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2005) 77 (4): 669–698.
Published: 01 December 2005
... is the] nervous Life of an American Fireman 685 system of the nation and modern societyItswiresspreadlike nerves over the surface of the land, interlinking distant parts He went on to address his own more specialized invention: ‘‘Its purpose is to multiply...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2015) 87 (3): 547–574.
Published: 01 September 2015
... primarily to variations in nervous systems resulting from the process of human evolution, and he predicts increased “divergences of sentiency” as humans continued to evolve (175). A physically painful experience like extracting a tooth or amputating a limb, he contends, “gives to dif- ferent persons...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2017) 89 (2): 305–329.
Published: 01 June 2017
..., but whether this male-created, male-dominated structure is really capable of serving the humanism and freedom it professes.” During this period, Rich was undergoing her own radical education through poetry and feminism, learning to trust her “nervous system” 4 and know in unauthorized ways. In The...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2013) 85 (1): 5–31.
Published: 01 March 2013
..., caffeine, railways, the industrial division of labor, and the social designs of reformers. All of these he not only thought about but felt in the brain, as a set of artificial mechanisms affecting the inner equilibrium he was seeking. The “restless, nervous, bustling, trivial Nineteenth Century...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2004) 76 (1): 117–148.
Published: 01 March 2004
... Barker as- signed her the task of studying the nucleus of Darkeschwitsch of an infant brain, later incorporating her drawings and descriptions into his lengthy neurological textbook, The Nervous System (1899). Remark- ably, following her failure to complete her medical course work in 1901, Stein...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2016) 88 (4): 787–814.
Published: 01 December 2016
...-mathesis , a nervous disease supposedly linked to syphilis (Norris 2015 , 217n1), which impairs his vision and coordination and eventually causes him to act like a wolf, running around naked on all fours while barking the word “Wolf!” over and over again. Vandover was the first novel Norris completed...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2016) 88 (2): 331–360.
Published: 01 June 2016
... psychiatrists who had been active during the previous war, recommended prompt treatment in the field and adequate screening to weed out soldiers who would be prone to nervous disorders, but they also supported the Ministry in refusing pensions to those diagnosed with psychological illness due to the violence of...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2001) 73 (3): 525–562.
Published: 01 September 2001
... his all-male entourage that constitutes the text’s ubiquitous homoerotic flow. For instance, the opening scene of Vandover describes his mother within the terms of neurasthenia, and thus directly traces Vandover’s own subsequent nervous condition to her, alluding to the inherited nature of his...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2003) 75 (1): 61–90.
Published: 01 March 2003
... and tiny nervous paroxysms of the last few months all at once cul- minated in some indefinite, indefinable crisis, and the wheels and cogs of all activities save one lapsed away and ceased. Only one function of...