1-20 of 352 Search Results for

moby

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
×Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2010) 82 (1): 190–192.
Published: 01 March 2010
... Cereno” and “Moby-Dick.” By Sterling Stuckey. New York: Oxford Univ. Press. 2009. ix, 154 pp. $27.95. Book Reviews Folded Selves: Colonial New England Writing in the World System. By Michelle Burnham. Hanover, N.H.: Dartmouth College Press. 2007. viii, 222 pp. Paper, $30.00...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2010) 82 (1): 192–195.
Published: 01 March 2010
...: The Fiction after “Moby-Dick,” 1851–1857 . By William V. Spanos. Albany: State Univ. of New York Press. 2008. xiv, 280 pp. Cloth, $80.00; paper, $26.95. Book Reviews Folded Selves: Colonial New England Writing in the World System. By Michelle Burnham. Hanover, N.H.: Dartmouth College...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2011) 83 (1): 29–57.
Published: 01 March 2011
...Christopher Taylor Taylor reads Herman Melville's Moby-Dick (1851) through the history of the captured prosthetic limb of Mexican General Antonio López de Santa Anna. U.S. travel narratives, soldiers' accounts, and P. T. Barnum's 1847 display of the captured prosthesis in his American Museum...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2013) 85 (4): 821–824.
Published: 01 December 2013
... : Oxford Univ. Press . 2012 . x, 239 pp . $65.00 . Secularism in Antebellum America: With Reference to Ghosts, Protestant Subcultures, Machines, and Their Metaphors; Featuring Discussion of Mass Media, “Moby-Dick,” Spirituality, Phrenology, Anthropology, Sing Sing State Penitentiary, and Sex with...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2010) 82 (2): 305–332.
Published: 01 June 2010
... Party and the “Young America” movement seemed to take a sinister turn with the 1850 Fugitive Slave Law, and Melville grew disillusioned with Young America's literary side following the poor reception of Moby-Dick (1851). Melville's fourth novel, Redburn (1849), though regarded as one of his secondary...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2011) 83 (4): 747–773.
Published: 01 December 2011
... American travel writing. By the 1850s this animal's association with wasteful expenditure had begun to surface even in prominent American literature, including Herman Melville's Moby-Dick (1851). He argues that the white whale operates in a manner that calls to mind the white elephant, and that this novel...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2012) 84 (3): 505–532.
Published: 01 September 2012
... and imagining of this raw material—literally avant la lettre—as a way of better understanding the economy of a substance whose manufactured sizes (folio, octavo, and duodecimo) he had already used to classify whales in Moby-Dick and on which his recalcitrant copyist, Bartleby, refuses to write...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2014) 86 (2): 245–274.
Published: 01 June 2014
... patriotism. I conclude by returning to Moby-Dick to demonstrate how this genealogy of disability representation opens up new ways of reading canonical disability-studies texts and of illuminating the cultural shift from impairment to identity. More broadly, this essay urges scholars to carefully historicize...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2005) 77 (2): 227–257.
Published: 01 June 2005
... recovered. The doctor who attended Te Pehi Kupe was so impressed by the reciprocal devotion of the two men that he conveyed their story to a writer in London, George Lillie Craik, who retold it in The New Zealanders (1830). Sometime before the composition of Moby-Dick (1850–51), Herman Melville came...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2012) 84 (3): 645–655.
Published: 01 September 2012
... J. Richard. Cambridge: Harvard Univ. Press. 2009. xiii, 258 pp. $47.50. Whipscars and Tattoos: “The Last of the Mohicans,” “Moby-­Dick,” and the Maori. By Geoffrey Sanborn. New York: Oxford Univ. Press. 2011. xv, 184 pp. $49.95. Some of the best recent work in nineteenth-­century American...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2016) 88 (1): 185–187.
Published: 01 March 2016
..., focus- ing on the progression of Douglass’s views from Garrisonian to strict construc- tionist, is the strongest component of Fugitive Bonds. Perhaps the weakest is his interpretation of Moby-Dick (1851). The attempts to grasp the symbolic meaning of the white whale are uncountable, but surely one...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2011) 83 (4): 885–888.
Published: 01 December 2011
... © 2011 by Duke University Press 2011 Brief Mention General “And So Hell’s Probable”: Herman Melville’s “Moby-­Dick” and “Pierre” as Descent Narratives. By Tamara Treichel. Trier, Germany: Wissenschaftlicher Verlag Trier. 2009. 235 pp. Paper, no price available. Treichel offers a...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2016) 88 (3): 655–659.
Published: 01 September 2016
... literature finds its most acute expression in his main argument, which is that “all war texts are at risk of feeding on the very violence they purportedly wish to denounce.” In support of his argument, Mariani close reads such texts as Joel Barlow’s Columbiad (1807), Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick (1851...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2013) 85 (4): 837–844.
Published: 01 December 2013
... Emerson and Whitman, he argues, as a “pattern of poetic ascent and descent” within a single life and between lives. This model of consciousness and American selfhood is an expressly poetic activity linked to self-reliance, individualism, and democratic struggle. Dive Deeper: Journeys with “Moby...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2004) 76 (1): 59–87.
Published: 01 March 2004
... Davidson’s indictment of separate spheres as ‘‘too crude an instrument—too rigid and totalizing7 The ‘‘masculine’’ space of the Pequod in Moby-Dick (1851) reveals itself, under close examination, to be far more ambiguous in its gender Melville and the Architecture of Masculinity...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2007) 79 (1): 229–240.
Published: 01 March 2007
... experimentalism in contemporary poetry by women in the United States, asking why recognition of this kind of work has thus far gone unnoticed and providing new readings of work by Waldrop, Hejinian, and Howe. Collections “Ungraspable Phantom”: Essays on Moby-Dick. Ed. John Bryant...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2017) 89 (4): 851–879.
Published: 01 December 2017
... chapter of Moby-Dick titled “Chowder.” The title refers to the signature menu item at the Try Pots Inn on Nantucket, where Ishmael and Queequeg stay as they seek out and await the departure of their chosen vessel, the Pequod . The inn’s name refers to the processing machinery of a nineteenth-century...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2011) 83 (3): 681–686.
Published: 01 September 2011
... © 2011 by Duke University Press 2011 Brief Mention General Chasing the White Whale: The “Moby-­Dick” Marathon; or, What Melville Means Today. By David Dowling. Iowa City: Univ. of Iowa Press. 2010. viii, 242 pp. Paper, $24.95. For over fifteen years, New Bedford, Massachusetts...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2013) 85 (4): 819–821.
Published: 01 December 2013
... Their Metaphors; Featuring Discussion of Mass Media, “Moby-Dick,” Spirituality, Phrenology, Anthropology, Sing Sing State Penitentiary, and Sex with the New Motive Power. By John Lardas Modern. Chicago: Univ. of Chicago Press. 2011. xxxiv, 313 pp. $40.00. These books examine the...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2018) 90 (1): 174–176.
Published: 01 March 2018
... Beecher Stowe and Herman Melville. Even these latter authors, moreover, occasionally receive opprobrium. As Ryan observes, Melville’s star has dimmed a bit since Elizabeth Renker’s suggestion in 1994 that the author of Moby-Dick (1851) and “Benito Cereno” had likely beaten his wife, Elizabeth Shaw...