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Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2006) 78 (4): 769–798.
Published: 01 December 2006
...Patricia Yaeger Duke University Press 2006 Patricia Circum-Atlantic Superabundance: Yaeger Milk as World-Making in Alice Randall and Kara Walker Whenissomethingtoomuch?Ifonewishedto define an aesthetics of excess, what would be its formal...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2016) 88 (3): 477–507.
Published: 01 September 2016
... personhood under the regime of chattel slavery. Slavery institutionally reduced the black body to its instrumental capacities and codified black maternity as the manufacture of laboring bodies, and black women’s maternal milk and care as extractable commodities. This mother-machine dynamic is forcefully...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2006) 78 (4): 677–690.
Published: 01 December 2006
... ‘‘superabundance In ‘‘Circum-Atlantic Superabun- dance: Milk as World-Making in Alice Randall and Kara Walker she develops a feminist aesthetics of excess located in trans-Atlantic and trans-Caribbean traffic. Yaeger begins by engaging the ‘‘surfeit or fecundity ‘‘the stunning, violent abundance of a world made...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2005) 77 (1): 65–92.
Published: 01 March 2005
Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2006) 78 (4): 859–867.
Published: 01 December 2006
... Essay 865 hence, African culture in his creolized use of language and its influ- ence on the children of white planters. Cartwright attributes an even greater importance to the influence of the language of milk bonds, transferred to white children by black nurses, and the concomitant acquisition of...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2015) 87 (4): 769–798.
Published: 01 December 2015
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2013) 85 (1): 33–60.
Published: 01 March 2013
...-fishing here, and looked like a loafer,7 was getting [his] living like himself,” with the difference that I did not use tea, nor coffee, nor butter, nor milk, nor fresh meat, and so did not have to . . . work hard to pay for them, and when he had worked hard he had to eat hard again to repair...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2009) 81 (3): 469–495.
Published: 01 September 2009
... simple-minded farmhand Jouy, who played “the familiar game called ‘curdled milk could become the object of “a judicial action, a medical intervention, a careful clinical examina- tion, and an entire theoretical elaboration.”24 As the complex regula- tion that ensues from this game makes clear...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2003) 75 (2): 473–486.
Published: 01 June 2003
... by a clever title, is ‘‘Come Back to the Boxcar, Leslie Honey: or, Don’t Cry For Me, Madonna, Just Pass the Milk: Steinbeck and Sentimentality Faulkner and Postmodernism. Ed. John N. Duvall and Ann J...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2015) 87 (1): 107–136.
Published: 01 March 2015
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2013) 85 (1): 5–31.
Published: 01 March 2013
... reliance on artificial stimulation. Thoreau tells him, I did not use tea, nor coffee, nor butter, nor milk, nor fresh meat, and so did not have to work to get them; again, as I did not work hard, I did not have to eat hard, and it cost me but a trifle for my food; but as he began with tea...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2008) 80 (1): 141–166.
Published: 01 March 2008
... gay rights movement was just getting underway. The novel takes place in queer, Latino San Francisco, in a pre-AIDS, post-Stonewall moment leading up to the 1977 election of gay activist Harvey Milk to the San Francisco Board of Supervisors, which brought new momentum to the gay rights...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2008) 80 (4): 707–738.
Published: 01 December 2008
... generic upsets of its own. Promising Sophia Hawthorne a placid domestic tale, Melville privately billed Pierre as a guaranteed whaleless romance. “I shall not again send you a bowl of salt water,” he wrote to her. “The next chalice I shall commend, will be a rural bowl of milk.”19...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2005) 77 (4): 761–785.
Published: 01 December 2005
... quiet little town. Wasn’t too much going on. Nothing like today. The people then they shared and cared. That made it nice. One person had maybe a cow. They’d milk the cow and they’d send the neighbors milk and butter. It was like one big family When Davis does recount an incident from her girlhood...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2001) 73 (3): 497–524.
Published: 01 September 2001
... libertine, the slave. In Kennedy’s telling, Whitman’s inclusion of ‘‘many long dumb’’ and ‘‘forbidden voices’’ marked him as a prophet who, unlike Higginson, ‘‘was not so childish in his philosophy as the milk-and-water Boston Unitarians who print their Sunday-school God...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2006) 78 (2): 207–234.
Published: 01 June 2006
... place of elegant seclusion where melancholy gentlemen and ladies may go to spend the advanced season of single life in drinking milk, walking in the woods & reading the Bible & the poets1 Whimsi- cal, with a touch of irony, Emerson pictured a mock utopia where solitude and simplicity would free the...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2007) 79 (3): 553–575.
Published: 01 September 2007
... to cry over spilt milk, if not, indeed, determi- nation to seem upbeat. Neither possibility will or should add “Con- science” to crowded syllabi. Opinions of this tale’s importance may nonetheless change dramatically if scholars come to see that Hurston tried to do something worthwhile in it...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2011) 83 (3): 547–570.
Published: 01 September 2011
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2011) 83 (2): 389–411.
Published: 01 June 2011
... most lovingly offered mother’s milk turn cold and sour in the shocked child’s clinched mouth. Vondramach explains that she had once created her own progeny. And possessing a great inter- est in sculpture, she encoded the unborn thing with the talents of the greatest of sculptors...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2015) 87 (4): 709–737.
Published: 01 December 2015