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Journal Article
American Literature (2017) 89 (4): 881–884.
Published: 01 December 2017
... Hutchins Zachary McLeod . New York : Oxford Univ. Press . 2014 . x, 329 pp. Cloth , $78.00 ; e-book available. Medical Encounters: Knowledge and Identity in Early American Literatures . By Wisecup Kelly . Amherst : Univ. of Massachusetts Press . 2013 . xi, 259 pp. Paper , $25.95 ; e...
Journal Article
American Literature (2014) 86 (3): 583–610.
Published: 01 September 2014
..., trusts, and corporations. The book presents the competition between these alternative paradigms by following the shifting career choices and internal conflicts of its protagonist, Dr. Howard Sommers, as he strives to satisfy his own vision—at times itself contradictory—of medical professionalism. By the...
Journal Article
American Literature (2013) 85 (1): 93–119.
Published: 01 March 2013
... health care activists, including C. V. Roman, founding member of the National Medical Association (1895) and the first editor of the Journal of the National Medical Association , E. Elliott Rawlins, health columnist for the Amsterdam News , and Mary Fitzbutler Waring, chair of the Committee for Health...
Journal Article
American Literature (2017) 89 (3): 557–590.
Published: 01 September 2017
... which this approach was narrated, how the form worked, and the effects of the genre on popular and medical knowledge. Contemporary global health has been reorganized around scientific empiricism, but elements of its gothic history remain. I conclude by suggesting the value of recuperating these gothic...
Journal Article
American Literature (2018) 90 (3): 523–551.
Published: 01 September 2018
.... Valdemar” with Justinus Kerner’s medical case history “The Seeress of Prevorst,” this essay compares the narrative constructions of verisimilitude in science and fiction. But in exploring the viral dissemination of “Valdemar,” I also analyze how nineteenth-century print media produced content and credence...
Journal Article
American Literature (2008) 80 (3): 527–554.
Published: 01 September 2008
... time, the temperance plot was updated to include the idea that such habituations might be nervous illnesses afflicting modern professional workers. Through its addicted protagonist Martin Jocelyn, Roe's novel engages these unevenly developing medical, reform, and popular early representations of...
Journal Article
American Literature (2015) 87 (3): 547–574.
Published: 01 September 2015
... suffering could inspire social change. This essay first surveys the medical advances, religious ideologies, and consumerist tendencies that contributed to the burgeoning perception of painlessness as a desirable and increasingly feasible goal before examining the implications of sentimentalist...
Journal Article
American Literature (2013) 85 (1): 5–31.
Published: 01 March 2013
...Benjamin Reiss This essay explores Henry David Thoreau's Walden in relation to the history of sleep, considered as a medical, biological, social, and spiritual phenomenon. Attention to Thoreau's striving for “awakening” and “alertness” has veiled his running rhetoric of dormancy: scenes and tropes...
Journal Article
American Literature (2020) 92 (4): 707–722.
Published: 01 December 2020
... reinforces racist and xenophobic discourses of containment and control with direct and deadly consequences. Mitigation of this pandemic and future pandemics will require not only medical but also representational interventions. References Allen Toph , Murray Kris A. , Zambrana-Torrelio...
Journal Article
American Literature (2020) 92 (4): 737–743.
Published: 01 December 2020
... the body) was debated hotly (Sudan 2016 : 113). Vaccination debates are often cast as the rights of the individual (to deny treatments and to consent to any medical interventions) against the rights of the public (to avoid encountering preventable diseases in the community). Like so many ethical...
Image
Published: 01 December 2019
Figure 1 “Nervous Function,” diagram from Holmes’s anatomy lecture notebook, 1852. Courtesy of the Harvard Medical Library in the Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine Figure 1 “Nervous Function,” diagram from Holmes’s anatomy lecture notebook, 1852. Courtesy of the Harvard Medical Library in More
Journal Article
American Literature (2020) 92 (1): 183–185.
Published: 01 March 2020
... somber recognition of what we might not have thought to try to understand, for this reader at least, passed directly into exuberant discovery of a new rhetorical and literary field, thanks to access to (inter)locutors whose medical lives are mapped across the full array of points on “the” spectrum...
Journal Article
American Literature (2004) 76 (4): 889–891.
Published: 01 December 2004
... history, whereas K. Patrick Ober confines himself to the life and writ- ings of Mark Twain, but both authors offer large insights into the mysteries of human illness and the lessons cultural historians can learn from nineteenth- century understandings of illness and medical treatment. Perhaps because...
Journal Article
American Literature (2004) 76 (4): 891–894.
Published: 01 December 2004
... account of the Twain family illnesses is interlaced with an engaging history of nineteenth-century medicine and Twain’s writings about the topic. In addition to his meticulous research on Twain’s life and writings, Ober brings the scientific and psychological knowledge of a medical professor who has...
Journal Article
American Literature (2004) 76 (1): 117–148.
Published: 01 March 2004
.... —Gertrude Stein, notebooks for The Making of Americans In 1902, less than a year after she left her scien- tific training at the Johns Hopkins Medical School, Gertrude Stein began preliminary work on The Making of Americans, subtitled ‘‘Being aHistoryofaFamily’sProgress1 In her...
Journal Article
American Literature (2005) 77 (1): 186–187.
Published: 01 March 2005
... daughter’s illness were relieved by the decision to hand over total responsibility to a medical ‘‘expert’’ on epilepsy. This ostensibly reasonable rationale on Twain’s part, however, was under- mined in Lystra’s account by a monstrous act of betrayal: it was one thing to confine his daughter to the...
Journal Article
American Literature (2020) 92 (4): 745–757.
Published: 01 December 2020
... Development Approach . Cambridge, MA : Harvard Univ. Press . Petrovski Sue Matthews . 2018 . Shelved: A Memoir of Aging in America . West Lafayette, IN : Purdue Univ. Press . Porter Roy . 1997 . The Greatest Benefit to Mankind: A Medical History of Humanity . New York : W. W...
Journal Article
American Literature (2001) 73 (3): 525–562.
Published: 01 September 2001
... hand and degenerative decay on the other, thus rigidly reinforc- ing racial, social, sexual, and political hierarchies. Marking a historical shift from notions of sin within moral doctrine to notions of disease within criminal law, the medicalization of homosexuality ‘‘transposed the amorphous...
Journal Article
American Literature (2004) 76 (4): 887–889.
Published: 01 December 2004
... offer large insights into the mysteries of human illness and the lessons cultural historians can learn from nineteenth- century understandings of illness and medical treatment. Perhaps because both writers are primarily concerned with cultural rather than scientific per- ceptions of illness, the...
Journal Article
American Literature (2018) 90 (4): 785–813.
Published: 01 December 2018
... aspect of the history, we know that in the aftermath of the trials reports surfaced that two women identified as antinomians, Hutchinson and Mary Dyer, gave birth to very strange fetal corpses that Puritan writers called “monstrous births.” Medical science today might identify Hutchinson’s and Dyer’s...