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Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2014) 86 (3): 583–610.
Published: 01 September 2014
..., trusts, and corporations. The book presents the competition between these alternative paradigms by following the shifting career choices and internal conflicts of its protagonist, Dr. Howard Sommers, as he strives to satisfy his own vision—at times itself contradictory—of medical professionalism. By the...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2017) 89 (4): 881–884.
Published: 01 December 2017
... Hutchins Zachary McLeod . New York : Oxford Univ. Press . 2014 . x, 329 pp. Cloth , $78.00 ; e-book available. Medical Encounters: Knowledge and Identity in Early American Literatures . By Wisecup Kelly . Amherst : Univ. of Massachusetts Press . 2013 . xi, 259 pp. Paper , $25.95 ; e...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2013) 85 (1): 93–119.
Published: 01 March 2013
... health care activists, including C. V. Roman, founding member of the National Medical Association (1895) and the first editor of the Journal of the National Medical Association , E. Elliott Rawlins, health columnist for the Amsterdam News , and Mary Fitzbutler Waring, chair of the Committee for Health...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2015) 87 (3): 547–574.
Published: 01 September 2015
... suffering could inspire social change. This essay first surveys the medical advances, religious ideologies, and consumerist tendencies that contributed to the burgeoning perception of painlessness as a desirable and increasingly feasible goal before examining the implications of sentimentalist...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2018) 90 (3): 523–551.
Published: 01 September 2018
.... Valdemar” with Justinus Kerner’s medical case history “The Seeress of Prevorst,” this essay compares the narrative constructions of verisimilitude in science and fiction. But in exploring the viral dissemination of “Valdemar,” I also analyze how nineteenth-century print media produced content and credence...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2008) 80 (3): 527–554.
Published: 01 September 2008
... time, the temperance plot was updated to include the idea that such habituations might be nervous illnesses afflicting modern professional workers. Through its addicted protagonist Martin Jocelyn, Roe's novel engages these unevenly developing medical, reform, and popular early representations of...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2013) 85 (1): 5–31.
Published: 01 March 2013
...Benjamin Reiss This essay explores Henry David Thoreau's Walden in relation to the history of sleep, considered as a medical, biological, social, and spiritual phenomenon. Attention to Thoreau's striving for “awakening” and “alertness” has veiled his running rhetoric of dormancy: scenes and tropes...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2017) 89 (3): 557–590.
Published: 01 September 2017
... which this approach was narrated, how the form worked, and the effects of the genre on popular and medical knowledge. Contemporary global health has been reorganized around scientific empiricism, but elements of its gothic history remain. I conclude by suggesting the value of recuperating these gothic...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2004) 76 (4): 889–891.
Published: 01 December 2004
... history, whereas K. Patrick Ober confines himself to the life and writ- ings of Mark Twain, but both authors offer large insights into the mysteries of human illness and the lessons cultural historians can learn from nineteenth- century understandings of illness and medical treatment. Perhaps because...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2004) 76 (4): 891–894.
Published: 01 December 2004
... account of the Twain family illnesses is interlaced with an engaging history of nineteenth-century medicine and Twain’s writings about the topic. In addition to his meticulous research on Twain’s life and writings, Ober brings the scientific and psychological knowledge of a medical professor who has...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2004) 76 (1): 117–148.
Published: 01 March 2004
.... —Gertrude Stein, notebooks for The Making of Americans In 1902, less than a year after she left her scien- tific training at the Johns Hopkins Medical School, Gertrude Stein began preliminary work on The Making of Americans, subtitled ‘‘Being aHistoryofaFamily’sProgress1 In her...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2005) 77 (1): 186–187.
Published: 01 March 2005
... daughter’s illness were relieved by the decision to hand over total responsibility to a medical ‘‘expert’’ on epilepsy. This ostensibly reasonable rationale on Twain’s part, however, was under- mined in Lystra’s account by a monstrous act of betrayal: it was one thing to confine his daughter to the...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2001) 73 (3): 525–562.
Published: 01 September 2001
... hand and degenerative decay on the other, thus rigidly reinforc- ing racial, social, sexual, and political hierarchies. Marking a historical shift from notions of sin within moral doctrine to notions of disease within criminal law, the medicalization of homosexuality ‘‘transposed the amorphous...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2004) 76 (4): 887–889.
Published: 01 December 2004
... offer large insights into the mysteries of human illness and the lessons cultural historians can learn from nineteenth- century understandings of illness and medical treatment. Perhaps because both writers are primarily concerned with cultural rather than scientific per- ceptions of illness, the...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2018) 90 (4): 785–813.
Published: 01 December 2018
... aftermath of the trials reports surfaced that two women identified as antinomians, Hutchinson and Mary Dyer, gave birth to very strange fetal corpses that Puritan writers called “monstrous births.” Medical science today might identify Hutchinson’s and Dyer’s health issues as common reproductive medical...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2018) 90 (3): 647–650.
Published: 01 September 2018
... William Harper, among others—introduces the medical and legal discourses that were later critically deployed by black antebellum writers; aside from exposing the fallacies that would formulate slavery as the answer to reasonable legal and medical questions, these authors stipulated a fresh account of...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2001) 73 (2): 421–422.
Published: 01 June 2001
... pervasive presence of gay themes in the culture that Cather herself was part of reminds Cather scholars that homosexuality, as a medicalized, politicized identity, was self-consciously available and utilized in many discourses dur...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2001) 73 (2): 422–423.
Published: 01 June 2001
... pervasive presence of gay themes in the culture that Cather herself was part of reminds Cather scholars that homosexuality, as a medicalized, politicized identity, was self-consciously available and utilized in many discourses dur...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2011) 83 (4): 889–891.
Published: 01 December 2011
... psychoanalysis without “women’s diseases” like hysteria or nervous disor- ders. Female sexuality and reproduction have historically been monitored by a male medical and psychoanalytic profession. Building design, fashion, and juridical definitions of identity have reinforced the idea that, as Iris...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2004) 76 (4): 777–806.
Published: 01 December 2004
... perceptions. Our culture encodes the logic of euthanasia in its celebration of concepts such as curing, repairing, or improving disabled bodies through procedures as diverse as reconstructive and aesthetic surgery, medication, tech- 780 American Literature nology, gene therapy, and faith healing. At...