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hobomok

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Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2014) 86 (4): 655–682.
Published: 01 December 2014
...Grant Shreve Since its recovery in the 1980s, Lydia Maria Child’s first novel, Hobomok (1824)—a Puritan historical romance set in Salem, Massachusetts, in the 1620s—has been read primarily in terms of how issues of race and gender operate in the novel. However, these readings ignore the fact that...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2014) 86 (4): 865–886.
Published: 01 December 2014
...: Aspiration and the Politics of Ungenre in Rebecca Harding Davis’s Life in the Iron Mills,” 523–49. Shreve, Grant. “Fragile Belief: Lydia Maria Child’s Hobomok and the Scene of American Secularity,” 655–82. Singh, Amardeep. Review: Abravanel, Americanizing Britain: The Rise of Mod- ernism in...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2017) 89 (3): 627–629.
Published: 01 September 2017
...–themed historical romances to recuperate a usable Puritan or Native past for the modern nation—detailing the plots of The Last of the Mohicans (1826), The Wept of Wish-ton-Wish (1829), Hobomok (1824), The Yemassee (1835), and Hope Leslie (1827)—doesn’t offer many insights beyond well...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2014) 86 (4): 645–654.
Published: 01 December 2014
... stories. We begin with Shreve’s reading of Lydia Maria Child’s 1824 novel Hobomok as both historical reflection of and metareflec- tion on what he delineates as a distinctively “American secularity”—a scene of belief’s fragilization by the proliferation rather than attenua- tion of belief under the...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2001) 73 (1): 121–145.
Published: 01 March 2001
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2004) 76 (3): 603–605.
Published: 01 September 2004
... of the U.S. Revolution surfaces in the writing of women who challenged their exclusion from democratic represen- tation. Because it was coded as ‘‘treasonous’’ (61), women’s anger is almost never the explicit theme of the texts Grasso analyzes (including Lydia Maria Child’s Hobomok, Maria...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2004) 76 (3): 605–607.
Published: 01 September 2004
... of the U.S. Revolution surfaces in the writing of women who challenged their exclusion from democratic represen- tation. Because it was coded as ‘‘treasonous’’ (61), women’s anger is almost never the explicit theme of the texts Grasso analyzes (including Lydia Maria Child’s Hobomok, Maria...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2004) 76 (3): 608–610.
Published: 01 September 2004
... almost never the explicit theme of the texts Grasso analyzes (including Lydia Maria Child’s Hobomok, Maria Stewart’s Productions,FannyFern’sRuth Hall, and Harriet Wilson’s Our Nig); rather, this anger is a powerful undercurrent in novels that thematize ‘‘illness, acts of sacrifice, supplicating tones...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2004) 76 (3): 610–612.
Published: 01 September 2004
... of the U.S. Revolution surfaces in the writing of women who challenged their exclusion from democratic represen- tation. Because it was coded as ‘‘treasonous’’ (61), women’s anger is almost never the explicit theme of the texts Grasso analyzes (including Lydia Maria Child’s Hobomok, Maria...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2004) 76 (3): 612–615.
Published: 01 September 2004
... of the U.S. Revolution surfaces in the writing of women who challenged their exclusion from democratic represen- tation. Because it was coded as ‘‘treasonous’’ (61), women’s anger is almost never the explicit theme of the texts Grasso analyzes (including Lydia Maria Child’s Hobomok, Maria...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2004) 76 (3): 615–617.
Published: 01 September 2004
... of the U.S. Revolution surfaces in the writing of women who challenged their exclusion from democratic represen- tation. Because it was coded as ‘‘treasonous’’ (61), women’s anger is almost never the explicit theme of the texts Grasso analyzes (including Lydia Maria Child’s Hobomok, Maria...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2004) 76 (3): 617–619.
Published: 01 September 2004
... Maria Child’s Hobomok, Maria Stewart’s Productions,FannyFern’sRuth Hall, and Harriet Wilson’s Our Nig); rather, this anger is a powerful undercurrent in novels that thematize ‘‘illness, acts of sacrifice, supplicating tones, captivity motifs, death, hunger, and emaciated bodies’’ (7). White women...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2004) 76 (3): 619–621.
Published: 01 September 2004
... Maria Child’s Hobomok, Maria Stewart’s Productions,FannyFern’sRuth Hall, and Harriet Wilson’s Our Nig); rather, this anger is a powerful undercurrent in novels that thematize ‘‘illness, acts of sacrifice, supplicating tones, captivity motifs, death, hunger, and emaciated bodies’’ (7). White women...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2004) 76 (3): 622–624.
Published: 01 September 2004
... in the writing of women who challenged their exclusion from democratic represen- tation. Because it was coded as ‘‘treasonous’’ (61), women’s anger is almost never the explicit theme of the texts Grasso analyzes (including Lydia Maria Child’s Hobomok, Maria Stewart’s Productions,FannyFern’sRuth...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2004) 76 (3): 624–626.
Published: 01 September 2004
... in the writing of women who challenged their exclusion from democratic represen- tation. Because it was coded as ‘‘treasonous’’ (61), women’s anger is almost never the explicit theme of the texts Grasso analyzes (including Lydia Maria Child’s Hobomok, Maria Stewart’s Productions,FannyFern’sRuth...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2004) 76 (3): 626–628.
Published: 01 September 2004
... of the U.S. Revolution surfaces in the writing of women who challenged their exclusion from democratic represen- tation. Because it was coded as ‘‘treasonous’’ (61), women’s anger is almost never the explicit theme of the texts Grasso analyzes (including Lydia Maria Child’s Hobomok, Maria...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2004) 76 (4): 749–775.
Published: 01 December 2004
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2010) 82 (1): 29–55.
Published: 01 March 2010
... or among old ruins (as in Lydia Maria Child’s Hobomok or Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter). But in the early nineteenth century, suffering soldiers were presented as living ruins, narrative agents who complicated Revolutionary history.9 This essay will examine James Fenimore...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2007) 79 (2): 243–273.
Published: 01 June 2007
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2017) 89 (3): 463–496.
Published: 01 September 2017
... 1836 the United States’ “retrospective age” of “biographies, histories, and criticism” between writers’ research-based antiquarianism and their selective construction of histories convenient to nationalist narratives. Texts as discrepant as A History of New York (1809), Hobomok (1824), and The...