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elmo

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Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2005) 77 (1): 123–150.
Published: 01 March 2005
...Elizabeth Fekete Trubey Duke University Press 2005 Elizabeth Emancipating the Lettered Slave: Sentiment and Fekete Slavery in Augusta Evans’s St. Elmo Trubey The historical link, through sympathy, of sentimen- tal literature and abolitionist politics has...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2005) 77 (1): 1–5.
Published: 01 March 2005
... pro- cess the deformation of mastery: the creation of new tools as opposed to the use of the master’s tools.3 In ‘‘Nameless Outrages: Narrative Authority, Rape Rhetoric, and the Dakota Conflict of 1862’’ and ‘‘Eman- cipating the Lettered Slave: Sentiment and Slavery in Augusta Evans’s St. Elmo...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2003) 75 (3): 675–689.
Published: 01 September 2003
... Correspondence of Augusta Jane Evans Wilson. Ed. Rebecca Grant Sexton. Columbia: Univ. of South Carolina Press. 2002. xxxv, 205 pp. $29.95. Although Wilson’s work is seldom anthologized, her fourth novel, St. Elmo...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2011) 83 (2): 305–329.
Published: 01 June 2011
... played by Weissmuller. The six movies Weissmuller made for MGM were not the first Tarzan films in any absolute sense— that honor would go to 1918’s forgettable Elmo Lincoln vehicle—but Weissmuller’s performance would both reestablish the franchise and transform it. The eighty-­eight feature...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2005) 77 (4): 699–728.
Published: 01 December 2005
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2001) 73 (1): 185–186.
Published: 01 March 2001
... their own terms when they marry (59). They are not, Tracey argues, reduced to mere objects of exchange because they have enlarged their potential sphere of action. Evans’s St. Elmo (1867) enacts conflicting views of female roles, participates in intertextual dialogue, and attempts to ameliorate...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2001) 73 (1): 186–187.
Published: 01 March 2001
... their own terms when they marry (59). They are not, Tracey argues, reduced to mere objects of exchange because they have enlarged their potential sphere of action. Evans’s St. Elmo (1867) enacts conflicting views of female roles, participates in intertextual dialogue, and attempts to ameliorate...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2001) 73 (1): 187–188.
Published: 01 March 2001
... their own terms when they marry (59). They are not, Tracey argues, reduced to mere objects of exchange because they have enlarged their potential sphere of action. Evans’s St. Elmo (1867) enacts conflicting views of female roles, participates in intertextual dialogue, and attempts to ameliorate...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2001) 73 (1): 188–189.
Published: 01 March 2001
... their own terms when they marry (59). They are not, Tracey argues, reduced to mere objects of exchange because they have enlarged their potential sphere of action. Evans’s St. Elmo (1867) enacts conflicting views of female roles, participates in intertextual dialogue, and attempts to ameliorate...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2001) 73 (1): 189–191.
Published: 01 March 2001
... their own terms when they marry (59). They are not, Tracey argues, reduced to mere objects of exchange because they have enlarged their potential sphere of action. Evans’s St. Elmo (1867) enacts conflicting views of female roles, participates in intertextual dialogue, and attempts to ameliorate...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2001) 73 (1): 191–192.
Published: 01 March 2001
... their own terms when they marry (59). They are not, Tracey argues, reduced to mere objects of exchange because they have enlarged their potential sphere of action. Evans’s St. Elmo (1867) enacts conflicting views of female roles, participates in intertextual dialogue, and attempts to ameliorate...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2001) 73 (1): 192–193.
Published: 01 March 2001
... their own terms when they marry (59). They are not, Tracey argues, reduced to mere objects of exchange because they have enlarged their potential sphere of action. Evans’s St. Elmo (1867) enacts conflicting views of female roles, participates in intertextual dialogue, and attempts to ameliorate...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2001) 73 (1): 193–194.
Published: 01 March 2001
... their own terms when they marry (59). They are not, Tracey argues, reduced to mere objects of exchange because they have enlarged their potential sphere of action. Evans’s St. Elmo (1867) enacts conflicting views of female roles, participates in intertextual dialogue, and attempts to ameliorate...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2001) 73 (1): 194–195.
Published: 01 March 2001
... their own terms when they marry (59). They are not, Tracey argues, reduced to mere objects of exchange because they have enlarged their potential sphere of action. Evans’s St. Elmo (1867) enacts conflicting views of female roles, participates in intertextual dialogue, and attempts to ameliorate...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2001) 73 (1): 196–197.
Published: 01 March 2001
... their own terms when they marry (59). They are not, Tracey argues, reduced to mere objects of exchange because they have enlarged their potential sphere of action. Evans’s St. Elmo (1867) enacts conflicting views of female roles, participates in intertextual dialogue, and attempts to ameliorate...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2001) 73 (1): 197–198.
Published: 01 March 2001
... their own terms when they marry (59). They are not, Tracey argues, reduced to mere objects of exchange because they have enlarged their potential sphere of action. Evans’s St. Elmo (1867) enacts conflicting views of female roles, participates in intertextual dialogue, and attempts to ameliorate...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2001) 73 (1): 198–199.
Published: 01 March 2001
... their own terms when they marry (59). They are not, Tracey argues, reduced to mere objects of exchange because they have enlarged their potential sphere of action. Evans’s St. Elmo (1867) enacts conflicting views of female roles, participates in intertextual dialogue, and attempts to ameliorate...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2001) 73 (1): 199–200.
Published: 01 March 2001
... their own terms when they marry (59). They are not, Tracey argues, reduced to mere objects of exchange because they have enlarged their potential sphere of action. Evans’s St. Elmo (1867) enacts conflicting views of female roles, participates in intertextual dialogue, and attempts to ameliorate...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2001) 73 (1): 200–201.
Published: 01 March 2001
... their own terms when they marry (59). They are not, Tracey argues, reduced to mere objects of exchange because they have enlarged their potential sphere of action. Evans’s St. Elmo (1867) enacts conflicting views of female roles, participates in intertextual dialogue, and attempts to ameliorate...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2001) 73 (1): 201–202.
Published: 01 March 2001
... their own terms when they marry (59). They are not, Tracey argues, reduced to mere objects of exchange because they have enlarged their potential sphere of action. Evans’s St. Elmo (1867) enacts conflicting views of female roles, participates in intertextual dialogue, and attempts to ameliorate...