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Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2000) 72 (4): 721–750.
Published: 01 December 2000
...Laura H. Korobkin Duke University Press 2000 Laura H. Murder by Madman: Criminal Responsibility, Korobkin Law, and Judgment in Wieland 6218 American Literature 72:4 / sheet 31 of238 At a critical moment in Charles...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2009) 81 (1): 65–92.
Published: 01 March 2009
... criminal acts, negotiated legal and literary conventions in their pursuit of legal subjectivity. Comparing a legal case and a literary text extends scholarship on literary treatments of antebellum crime to determine how both women challenged early American legal and cultural understandings of black...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2019) 91 (3): 491–521.
Published: 01 September 2019
... person rather than the human or the citizen, United States v. Amy alerts us to the lethal legacy of slave personhood as a debilitating mixture of civil death and criminal culpability. Nowhere, perhaps, is that legacy more evident than in viral videos of police misconduct. And nowhere do we see a more...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2018) 90 (1): 111–140.
Published: 01 March 2018
... undermines the state’s claims to rationality and moderation and that the book’s exploration of queer, criminalized, and racialized subjectivity resists the pathologizing discourses that legitimized state violence. The novel’s transformation did not merely excise its sexual content, then, but greatly...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2009) 81 (1): 7–34.
Published: 01 March 2009
... newsprint constituted the agency and subjectivity of slaves who petitioned Northern courts for freedom (in counterdistinction from the criminal will of the fugitive). Their cases reveal the contradictory logic by which abolitionists disregarded the slaves' express desires to remain with their masters, and...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2012) 84 (1): 119–149.
Published: 01 March 2012
... Gatsby's criminality. In the end, these tabloid shadows allow us to challenge the recent revisionist arguments about the corporate and Fordist character of Gatsby's gangsterhood, and to reassess Fitzgerald's contribution to the form of vernacular modernism we now call American noir. © 2012 by Duke...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2017) 89 (1): 57–89.
Published: 01 March 2017
... experts, saving “future citizens” by rescuing them “out of a life of crime” and into white, middle-class domesticity, at the same time articulating the child’s biological mother as criminal and nonwhite. Copyright © 2017 by Duke University Press 2017 adoption realism race and ethnicity...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2002) 74 (2): 373–401.
Published: 01 June 2002
...- gent, sometimes antagonistic relationship between sentimental and legal discourses. The image of womanhood that emerges from the complex intersec- tion of sentiment and law, which I will examine in this essay, alternates between victim and criminal, between object of collective fantasy and...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2001) 73 (1): 121–145.
Published: 01 March 2001
... which he would like to replace the utopian colony of Blithedale. More’s apoc- ryphal Utopia, however, had no prisons; a two-tiered justice system provided pleasant slavery for a first offense and execution for a two- time loser.2 The approach to managing criminals in More’s sixteenth- century Utopia...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2019) 91 (3): 447–457.
Published: 01 September 2019
... figure of the legal person rather than the human or citizen. Examining a nineteenth-century case of slave law, United States v. Amy (1859), DeLombard demonstrates how the case shows the “lethal legacy of slave personhood as a debilitating mixture of civil death and criminal culpability.” That is, the...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2006) 78 (2): 325–355.
Published: 01 June 2006
... Norman’s to press for the criminal- ization of seduction, some feminists countered that improving edu- cation and work opportunities for women would render such legisla- tion unnecessary. Meanwhile, both sides agreed on the injustice of a double standard that relegated seduced women to social ostracism...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2005) 77 (1): 196–198.
Published: 01 March 2005
... genres, including autobiography, press accounts, film, and fiction. His analysis draws connections between FBI director J. Edgar Hoover’s attempts to ‘‘map’’ the United States (to demarcate and control criminality) with the narratives of real and fictional fugitives who resisted such mapping. Beverly...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2005) 77 (2): 349–377.
Published: 01 June 2005
... are also seen neglecting their duty, sleeping on the job, and fraternizing with career criminals. In Prince of the City, Mafia influence even leads to the corruption of the criminal court system. Even the revisionist urban histories written in the resurgent pluralism of the 1970s, which generally...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2001) 73 (2): 435–436.
Published: 01 June 2001
...- gate not just a particular crime but the more general offenses in which the patriarchal power structure of contemporary society itself is potentially in- criminated’’ (4). Walton and Jones pursue various...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2009) 81 (1): 35–64.
Published: 01 March 2009
... the fugitive’s previous Southern bondage.6 Revelation of fugitives’ histories could transport them back to the South not only geographically, but temporally—back to their prior status as property capable of only criminal agency. And, although the goal of the abolitionist...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2017) 89 (1): 188–190.
Published: 01 March 2017
... masculinities. His most resonant construction appears in the book’s introduction where he offers the term racial magnetism to describe the binary axes upon which Asian and black men are positioned: “brain/body, hardworking/lazy, nerd/criminal, culture/genetics, acceptability/monstrosity” (3–4). While...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2006) 78 (2): 207–234.
Published: 01 June 2006
...- son’smeditationsonthesoulhavenotyetfullyunderstoodtheconse- quences of this alchemy. The more the cell becomes a metaphor for subjectivity at large, the more the historical prison disappears. Reformers imagine the penitentiary as a mechanism that corrects criminals, and just as the image of the self-correcting penitent obscures the physical...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2016) 88 (4): 665–693.
Published: 01 December 2016
... and rapine.” According to his first biographer, Brown brooded that “if the widow and the orphan were . . . by a legal robbery deprived of their just and righteous claims through the superior artifice or eloquence of the advocate, was he not as criminal as the man who committed such felony without the...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2011) 83 (1): 121–151.
Published: 01 March 2011
... argument maintains that because the criminal justice sys- State Killing, Innocence, and The Exonerated 127 tem is fallible and mistakes will occur and because there are alter- natives to death, a democratic state cannot justify this irreversible punishment...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2019) 91 (3): 619–647.
Published: 01 September 2019
... the backbone of black people’s categorization as bare life, since their variable status throughout US history as slaves, incarcerated criminals, and disenfranchised nonconstituents has consistently ensured their exclusion from full political participation in the civic order alongside their necessary...