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Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2000) 72 (1): 117–152.
Published: 01 March 2000
... ‘‘coon’’ era (roughly from 1885 to 1910) typi- cally worked to dispel such ambiguity, fixing categories of identity Tseng 2000.2.24 11:09 120 American Literature accordingto a reassuringlogic of racial essentialism...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2000) 72 (2): 249–274.
Published: 01 June 2000
... 1900s were ‘‘coon songs which—like the dialect fiction also popu- lar at this timexed on the page’’ and in the minds of listeners and readers a very narrow set of stereotyped plantation scenarios and ‘‘happy darky...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2018) 90 (3): 553–584.
Published: 01 September 2018
... racialized form from the earlier story. Senarens includes in this mix the painfully written Pomp (short for “Pompey,” gesturing to the “coon” stereotype’s pretensions while also echoing the name of the “old negro valet” in Poe, discussed above), a character who will stick around long after the black steam...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2019) 91 (3): 557–586.
Published: 01 September 2019
... Home, Good-Night!” (1853): with crudely drawn racialisms and a heavy dose of Victorian sentimentalism, Foster’s lyric mourned the absence of a plantation’s black workers—their actions, their bodies, their voices: 5 They hunt no more for the possum and the coon On the meadow, the hill and the shore...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2001) 73 (2): 365–386.
Published: 01 June 2001
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2012) 84 (1): 61–87.
Published: 01 March 2012
..., and, on the other hand, a popular stage image (and song) of the buffoon. Minstrel characters such as Jim Crow and Zip Coon (who pre- tends to be a man of class to comic effect) fulfilled the much-­vaunted fantasy that upwardly mobile African Americans could never truly rise above the...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2005) 77 (1): 65–92.
Published: 01 March 2005
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2003) 75 (3): 545–569.
Published: 01 September 2003
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2013) 85 (1): 185–188.
Published: 01 March 2013
... Topsy, Bernstein explains, portray an insensate creature, impervious to pain. Bernstein traces this same angel/ pickanninny split between white and black children as it persists, scripted in Kemble’s Coon’s Alphabet, reprints of Uncle Tom’s Cabin, and dolls like Rag- gedy Ann. Bernstein’s method...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2013) 85 (1): 188–190.
Published: 01 March 2013
... becomes the embodiment of innocence, emo- tional depth, and fragility. Legacies of Topsy, Bernstein explains, portray an insensate creature, impervious to pain. Bernstein traces this same angel/ pickanninny split between white and black children as it persists, scripted in Kemble’s Coon’s Alphabet...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2013) 85 (1): 190–192.
Published: 01 March 2013
... Topsy, Bernstein explains, portray an insensate creature, impervious to pain. Bernstein traces this same angel/ pickanninny split between white and black children as it persists, scripted in Kemble’s Coon’s Alphabet, reprints of Uncle Tom’s Cabin, and dolls like Rag- gedy Ann. Bernstein’s method...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2013) 85 (1): 193–195.
Published: 01 March 2013
... becomes the embodiment of innocence, emo- tional depth, and fragility. Legacies of Topsy, Bernstein explains, portray an insensate creature, impervious to pain. Bernstein traces this same angel/ pickanninny split between white and black children as it persists, scripted in Kemble’s Coon’s Alphabet...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2013) 85 (1): 195–197.
Published: 01 March 2013
..., emo- tional depth, and fragility. Legacies of Topsy, Bernstein explains, portray an insensate creature, impervious to pain. Bernstein traces this same angel/ pickanninny split between white and black children as it persists, scripted in Kemble’s Coon’s Alphabet, reprints of Uncle Tom’s Cabin...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2013) 85 (1): 197–199.
Published: 01 March 2013
... becomes the embodiment of innocence, emo- tional depth, and fragility. Legacies of Topsy, Bernstein explains, portray an insensate creature, impervious to pain. Bernstein traces this same angel/ pickanninny split between white and black children as it persists, scripted in Kemble’s Coon’s Alphabet...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2013) 85 (1): 199–202.
Published: 01 March 2013
... persists, scripted in Kemble’s Coon’s Alphabet, reprints of Uncle Tom’s Cabin, and dolls like Rag- gedy Ann. Bernstein’s method allows her to also consider the unrecognized performances of black children. Alhough imagined and imaged as incapable of feeling as a child, Bernstein argues that black...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2013) 85 (1): 202–204.
Published: 01 March 2013
... becomes the embodiment of innocence, emo- tional depth, and fragility. Legacies of Topsy, Bernstein explains, portray an insensate creature, impervious to pain. Bernstein traces this same angel/ pickanninny split between white and black children as it persists, scripted in Kemble’s Coon’s Alphabet...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2002) 74 (3): 455–483.
Published: 01 September 2002
... somethin’ Hurston and the Verdict from the Porch 467 unlessAhgiveyoudeunderstandin’togo‘longwidit.Unlessyousee de fur, a mink skin ain’t no different from a coon hide’’ (7).29 For Hurston, then, a story’s value as mink skin depends on the nu- anced telling of speakers like...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2014) 86 (2): 391–393.
Published: 01 June 2014
... subjugated Oriental woman. In the 1910s, the popular Jewish vaudeville performer Sophie Tucker rose to fame as a blackface innovator of “coon shouting,” incorporating Yid- dish into her acts while also contributing to the development of the blues. In the 1990s, celebrated Asian American novelist Gish...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2014) 86 (2): 394–396.
Published: 01 June 2014
... Cooper advocated for the inclusion of African American women in American modernity over and against the contrasting image of the subjugated Oriental woman. In the 1910s, the popular Jewish vaudeville performer Sophie Tucker rose to fame as a blackface innovator of “coon shouting,” incorporating Yid...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2014) 86 (2): 397–400.
Published: 01 June 2014
... subjugated Oriental woman. In the 1910s, the popular Jewish vaudeville performer Sophie Tucker rose to fame as a blackface innovator of “coon shouting,” incorporating Yid- dish into her acts while also contributing to the development of the blues. In the 1990s, celebrated Asian American novelist Gish...