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Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2000) 72 (1): 117–152.
Published: 01 March 2000
... ‘‘coon’’ era (roughly from 1885 to 1910) typi- cally worked to dispel such ambiguity, fixing categories of identity Tseng 2000.2.24 11:09 120 American Literature accordingto a reassuringlogic of racial essentialism...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2000) 72 (2): 249–274.
Published: 01 June 2000
... 1900s were ‘‘coon songs which—like the dialect fiction also popu- lar at this timexed on the page’’ and in the minds of listeners and readers a very narrow set of stereotyped plantation scenarios and ‘‘happy darky...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2018) 90 (3): 553–584.
Published: 01 September 2018
... possibly indexing the iron bits used as punishment for unruly slaves), reads as a contained Zip Coon. This arrogant, ostentatious figure, first played by George Dixon in 1834, typically dressed in high style and spoke in a series of malapropisms and puns that undermined his attempts to appear dignified...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2001) 73 (2): 365–386.
Published: 01 June 2001
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2012) 84 (1): 61–87.
Published: 01 March 2012
..., and, on the other hand, a popular stage image (and song) of the buffoon. Minstrel characters such as Jim Crow and Zip Coon (who pre- tends to be a man of class to comic effect) fulfilled the much-­vaunted fantasy that upwardly mobile African Americans could never truly rise above the...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2005) 77 (1): 65–92.
Published: 01 March 2005
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2003) 75 (3): 545–569.
Published: 01 September 2003
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2013) 85 (1): 185–188.
Published: 01 March 2013
... Topsy, Bernstein explains, portray an insensate creature, impervious to pain. Bernstein traces this same angel/ pickanninny split between white and black children as it persists, scripted in Kemble’s Coon’s Alphabet, reprints of Uncle Tom’s Cabin, and dolls like Rag- gedy Ann. Bernstein’s method...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2013) 85 (1): 188–190.
Published: 01 March 2013
... becomes the embodiment of innocence, emo- tional depth, and fragility. Legacies of Topsy, Bernstein explains, portray an insensate creature, impervious to pain. Bernstein traces this same angel/ pickanninny split between white and black children as it persists, scripted in Kemble’s Coon’s Alphabet...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2013) 85 (1): 190–192.
Published: 01 March 2013
... Topsy, Bernstein explains, portray an insensate creature, impervious to pain. Bernstein traces this same angel/ pickanninny split between white and black children as it persists, scripted in Kemble’s Coon’s Alphabet, reprints of Uncle Tom’s Cabin, and dolls like Rag- gedy Ann. Bernstein’s method...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2013) 85 (1): 193–195.
Published: 01 March 2013
... becomes the embodiment of innocence, emo- tional depth, and fragility. Legacies of Topsy, Bernstein explains, portray an insensate creature, impervious to pain. Bernstein traces this same angel/ pickanninny split between white and black children as it persists, scripted in Kemble’s Coon’s Alphabet...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2013) 85 (1): 195–197.
Published: 01 March 2013
..., emo- tional depth, and fragility. Legacies of Topsy, Bernstein explains, portray an insensate creature, impervious to pain. Bernstein traces this same angel/ pickanninny split between white and black children as it persists, scripted in Kemble’s Coon’s Alphabet, reprints of Uncle Tom’s Cabin...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2013) 85 (1): 197–199.
Published: 01 March 2013
... becomes the embodiment of innocence, emo- tional depth, and fragility. Legacies of Topsy, Bernstein explains, portray an insensate creature, impervious to pain. Bernstein traces this same angel/ pickanninny split between white and black children as it persists, scripted in Kemble’s Coon’s Alphabet...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2013) 85 (1): 199–202.
Published: 01 March 2013
... persists, scripted in Kemble’s Coon’s Alphabet, reprints of Uncle Tom’s Cabin, and dolls like Rag- gedy Ann. Bernstein’s method allows her to also consider the unrecognized performances of black children. Alhough imagined and imaged as incapable of feeling as a child, Bernstein argues that black...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2013) 85 (1): 202–204.
Published: 01 March 2013
... becomes the embodiment of innocence, emo- tional depth, and fragility. Legacies of Topsy, Bernstein explains, portray an insensate creature, impervious to pain. Bernstein traces this same angel/ pickanninny split between white and black children as it persists, scripted in Kemble’s Coon’s Alphabet...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 December 2010) 82 (4): 725–752.
Published: 01 December 2010
... blackness as expressed in song was still to be found in the famous Williams and Walker comedies—notoriously marketed as the work of “Two Real Coons”—and in up-to-the-minute, sophis- ticated 1920s fare like Shuffle Along, From Dixie to Broadway, and Plantation Review. As ever, these shows were...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2019) 91 (1): 1–29.
Published: 01 March 2019
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2008) 80 (1): 57–81.
Published: 01 March 2008
..., granddaughter of Robert E. Lee, watches with nostalgia in the poem with her name as its title, the per- former’s physical antics are accompanied by noises from the band; the “zip, boom” every time he slips and falls sounds the history of black- face performance in its echo of “Zip Coon,” the stock...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2002) 74 (3): 455–483.
Published: 01 September 2002
... somethin’ Hurston and the Verdict from the Porch 467 unlessAhgiveyoudeunderstandin’togo‘longwidit.Unlessyousee de fur, a mink skin ain’t no different from a coon hide’’ (7).29 For Hurston, then, a story’s value as mink skin depends on the nu- anced telling of speakers like...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2014) 86 (2): 391–393.
Published: 01 June 2014
... subjugated Oriental woman. In the 1910s, the popular Jewish vaudeville performer Sophie Tucker rose to fame as a blackface innovator of “coon shouting,” incorporating Yid- dish into her acts while also contributing to the development of the blues. In the 1990s, celebrated Asian American novelist Gish...