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Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2000) 72 (1): 117–152.
Published: 01 March 2000
... the fluidity of a borderless self, often simultaneously.7 History presents an important complication to this claim, however, for ethnic imagery of the ‘‘coon’’ era (roughly from 1885 to 1910) typi- cally worked to...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2000) 72 (2): 249–274.
Published: 01 June 2000
... 1900s were ‘‘coon songs which—like the dialect fiction also popu- lar at this timexed on the page’’ and in the minds of listeners and readers a very narrow set of stereotyped plantation scenarios and ‘‘happy darky...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2018) 90 (3): 553–584.
Published: 01 September 2018
... ritualistically depicted as intellectually inferior, indexing, once again, the minstrel “coon” caricature. These scenes uniformly involve some crude malapropism, with the professor or orphan boys correcting Washington, but only after finding some way to make fun of his mistake. As the series unfolds, these scenes...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2001) 73 (2): 365–386.
Published: 01 June 2001
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2012) 84 (1): 61–87.
Published: 01 March 2012
..., and, on the other hand, a popular stage image (and song) of the buffoon. Minstrel characters such as Jim Crow and Zip Coon (who pre- tends to be a man of class to comic effect) fulfilled the much-­vaunted fantasy that upwardly mobile African Americans could never truly rise above the...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2005) 77 (1): 65–92.
Published: 01 March 2005
Journal Article
American Literature (1 September 2003) 75 (3): 545–569.
Published: 01 September 2003
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2013) 85 (1): 185–188.
Published: 01 March 2013
... Topsy, Bernstein explains, portray an insensate creature, impervious to pain. Bernstein traces this same angel/ pickanninny split between white and black children as it persists, scripted in Kemble’s Coon’s Alphabet, reprints of Uncle Tom’s Cabin, and dolls like Rag- gedy Ann. Bernstein’s method...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2013) 85 (1): 188–190.
Published: 01 March 2013
... becomes the embodiment of innocence, emo- tional depth, and fragility. Legacies of Topsy, Bernstein explains, portray an insensate creature, impervious to pain. Bernstein traces this same angel/ pickanninny split between white and black children as it persists, scripted in Kemble’s Coon’s Alphabet...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2013) 85 (1): 190–192.
Published: 01 March 2013
... Topsy, Bernstein explains, portray an insensate creature, impervious to pain. Bernstein traces this same angel/ pickanninny split between white and black children as it persists, scripted in Kemble’s Coon’s Alphabet, reprints of Uncle Tom’s Cabin, and dolls like Rag- gedy Ann. Bernstein’s method...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2013) 85 (1): 193–195.
Published: 01 March 2013
..., emo- tional depth, and fragility. Legacies of Topsy, Bernstein explains, portray an insensate creature, impervious to pain. Bernstein traces this same angel/ pickanninny split between white and black children as it persists, scripted in Kemble’s Coon’s Alphabet, reprints of Uncle Tom’s Cabin...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2013) 85 (1): 195–197.
Published: 01 March 2013
..., emo- tional depth, and fragility. Legacies of Topsy, Bernstein explains, portray an insensate creature, impervious to pain. Bernstein traces this same angel/ pickanninny split between white and black children as it persists, scripted in Kemble’s Coon’s Alphabet, reprints of Uncle Tom’s Cabin...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2013) 85 (1): 197–199.
Published: 01 March 2013
..., emo- tional depth, and fragility. Legacies of Topsy, Bernstein explains, portray an insensate creature, impervious to pain. Bernstein traces this same angel/ pickanninny split between white and black children as it persists, scripted in Kemble’s Coon’s Alphabet, reprints of Uncle Tom’s Cabin...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2013) 85 (1): 199–202.
Published: 01 March 2013
... persists, scripted in Kemble’s Coon’s Alphabet, reprints of Uncle Tom’s Cabin, and dolls like Rag- gedy Ann. Bernstein’s method allows her to also consider the unrecognized performances of black children. Alhough imagined and imaged as incapable of feeling as a child, Bernstein argues that black...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2013) 85 (1): 202–204.
Published: 01 March 2013
..., emo- tional depth, and fragility. Legacies of Topsy, Bernstein explains, portray an insensate creature, impervious to pain. Bernstein traces this same angel/ pickanninny split between white and black children as it persists, scripted in Kemble’s Coon’s Alphabet, reprints of Uncle Tom’s Cabin...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 March 2017) 89 (1): 29–56.
Published: 01 March 2017
... as Jim Crow, Zip Coon, and Jim Dandy—types that found their way into Stowe’s novel despite her rejection of the theater as immoral—blackface minstrelsy occasionally incorporated sentimental figures through the musical compositions of Stephen Foster. 5 Yet it was Stowe’s novel, which William...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2014) 86 (2): 391–393.
Published: 01 June 2014
... subjugated Oriental woman. In the 1910s, the popular Jewish vaudeville performer Sophie Tucker rose to fame as a blackface innovator of “coon shouting,” incorporating Yid- dish into her acts while also contributing to the development of the blues. In the 1990s, celebrated Asian American novelist Gish...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2014) 86 (2): 394–396.
Published: 01 June 2014
... Cooper advocated for the inclusion of African American women in American modernity over and against the contrasting image of the subjugated Oriental woman. In the 1910s, the popular Jewish vaudeville performer Sophie Tucker rose to fame as a blackface innovator of “coon shouting,” incorporating Yid...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2014) 86 (2): 397–400.
Published: 01 June 2014
... subjugated Oriental woman. In the 1910s, the popular Jewish vaudeville performer Sophie Tucker rose to fame as a blackface innovator of “coon shouting,” incorporating Yid- dish into her acts while also contributing to the development of the blues. In the 1990s, celebrated Asian American novelist Gish...
Journal Article
American Literature (1 June 2014) 86 (2): 400–402.
Published: 01 June 2014
... Cooper advocated for the inclusion of African American women in American modernity over and against the contrasting image of the subjugated Oriental woman. In the 1910s, the popular Jewish vaudeville performer Sophie Tucker rose to fame as a blackface innovator of “coon shouting,” incorporating Yid...