Ariel Zatarain Tumbaga, Adam Spry, and Kirby Brown situate their studies within specific Indigenous contexts that affirm the continued vibrancy of Indigenous peoples and lifeways and the importance of story to self-determination and decolonial futures. Read in conversation, the texts baldly demonstrate that the eradication of Indigenous nations was a central tenet of Indian policy across Mexico, the United States, and Canada in the long twentieth century and moreover that literature played an important role in these projects. The shape of these colonial efforts varied, but there is disturbing consistency in North American colonial states’ vigilant attacks on Indigenous self-determination and reliance on displacing living Indigenous peoples and reifying fictionalized “Indians.” While much has been written about nineteenth-century colonial cultural production in this regard, there has been less scholarly attention on the significance of twentieth-century literature. More importantly, however, Tumbaga, Spry, and...

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