These three critical works offer new ways of thinking through transnational literary connections and are conscious of both the historical resonances of colonialism and the structures of power in today’s globalized world. Each study is attentive to questions of scale—geographical and temporal—and the limits inherent in the frames that we use to position literature. Jennifer Harford Vargas’s Forms of Dictatorship offers an expansive view of transnational American literature, applying dictatorship as a literary trope, well-established in Latin American literature, to a subset of Latina/o fiction: the Latina/o dictatorship novel. Harford Vargas’s work seeks to extend explorations to more fully incorporate the hemispheric “haunting afterlives” of dictatorships (4). John C. Havard’s Hispanicism and Early US Literature expands the framing of United States literature to consider those texts created at the margins of the nation, conceptualizing Hispanicism, “a literary tradition that displays a US...

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