Siemerling’s book has the gravitas of a textbook, Madera’s the precision of a poem. Together they announce a new era for literary studies of the African diaspora, one which borrows from the capaciousness of Atlantic and hemispheric geographies while embarking on a pointed return to the specificities of place and nation. Madera offers a theory of the geographic imaginary, teaching us to interpret the worlds authored and inhabited by African Americans in the mid- to late nineteenth century. Siemerling expounds a canon of black Canadian literature so immense that the book itself seems to tilt the axis northward. Yet both authors keep a close eye on the Caribbean, a region formative for many Canadian writers and important within many of the nineteenth-century novels Madera explores.

It makes perfect sense that the Atlantic Ocean emerged as an emblematic epicenter for the cultural forms...

Article PDF first page preview

Article PDF first page preview
You do not currently have access to this content.