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Journal Article
American Literary Scholarship (2010) 2008 (1): 441–454.
Published: 01 September 2010
... with widely noted insti- tutional contexts, journal articles continue to lose ground in comparison to monographs. Apart from other factors, if one seeks to make claims about the national imaginary, even well-crafted articles have difficulty attaining the scope of a book. i  Histories and Genres...
Journal Article
American Literary Scholarship (2004) 2002 (1): 425–441.
Published: 01 September 2004
..., or even a≈r- mative action)? One of the central benefits of Race, Citizenship, and Law in American Literature is its ability to make connections between, say, Supreme Court decisions and novels, or newspaper accounts and essays or poetry. Given the contentious contemporary discussions over racial...
Journal Article
American Literary Scholarship (2007) 2005 (1): 369–398.
Published: 01 September 2007
... criticism available, even when Schultz herself notes that the criticism may not conform at all points with the claims she is making. This is, however, a commendable inclusiveness in a study that seeks to revise—or refine—received narratives of 20th-century literary history. It also points...
Journal Article
American Literary Scholarship (2010) 2008 (1): 173–184.
Published: 01 September 2010
... in which Faulkner’s “vantage point was distinctly comic rather than tragic.” Again, even granting Porter her general audience, she seems rather to sniff at the whole enterprise of Faulkner scholar- ship in the last lines of the book: recommending that a new Faulkner “addict” should attend the annual...
Journal Article
American Literary Scholarship (2005) 2003 (1): 499–513.
Published: 01 September 2005
... to provide, but Gillman reads this confusion as honest, and even, à la Walter Benjamin, messianic and prophetic. Gillman makes her case best with the popular fiction of the day— Pauline Hopkins, Thomas Dixon, and others—but her argument also Gary Lee Stonum and Theodore O. Mason Jr. 501...
Journal Article
American Literary Scholarship (2014) 2012 (1): 153–173.
Published: 01 September 2014
... beyond those used with perhaps any other American writer. Several articles draw on the more recent field of disability studies, while formalist and even deconstructive or Derridean readings return after their long eclipse by more generally historicist and cultural approaches. One sustained...
Journal Article
American Literary Scholarship (2002) 2000 (1): 435–449.
Published: 01 September 2002
... of entry into an experience and a cultural identity otherwise thought alien to nonblack readers. In Connor’s analysis even agnostic writers such as Richard Wright can be brought under the umbrella of liberation theology, by way of the psychological e√ects of the slave narrative genre. The strength...
Journal Article
American Literary Scholarship (2022) 2020 (1): 359–379.
Published: 01 September 2022
... Lee, Bruce Norris, and J. T. Rogers), explains his critical approach succinctly: There is a sense in which all writing could be said to bear the impress of the author, as of the moment, even as imagination may seek to transcend the lodestone of the self and the times. Thus despite the general...
Journal Article
American Literary Scholarship (2021) 2019 (1): 67–82.
Published: 01 September 2021
...), collects letters from Grace King, Mark Twain, the Clemens family, and others, from to . rough the letters and editorial commentary, Pfe er fully docu- ments the literary and personal friendship between the Southern writer King and Twain, but even more so, the deep bond between King and Livy Clemens as well...
Journal Article
American Literary Scholarship (2014) 2012 (1): 315–348.
Published: 01 September 2014
.... Because master narratives are viewed with suspicion, traditional literary history (of the chronicle sort) has yielded to inform- ing metaphors. Yet those metaphors almost always speak for a manner of control, to the point that writing ends up being even more focused than before. The virtue...
Journal Article
American Literary Scholarship (2022) 2020 (1): 179–197.
Published: 01 September 2022
... full claim to the literatures of the early Republic, the period up through the 1830s and predating the American Renaissance, which traditionally has been claimed by scholars of 19th-century American literature as their territory. Early Americanists are now regularly and even aggressively addressing...
Journal Article
American Literary Scholarship (2015) 2013 (1): 81–99.
Published: 01 September 2015
... and the nature of a scholarly edition. At 733 pages, it is massive, and even fuller than the first volume in the sense that it does not need to contain the extensive, excellent critical introductions. Read- ers who can follow Mark Twain’s eccentric, rambling, chaotic plan will be rewarded on every page...
Journal Article
American Literary Scholarship (2015) 2013 (1): 373–401.
Published: 01 September 2015
... actually specialized in “poetry,” and adjacency signaled specialists in “drama” or the “novel.” Today, even specialists within the same genre (“poetry”) and the same period (“the present”) are in some sense adjacent to one another, given the emergence of new critical (not to be confused with New...
Journal Article
American Literary Scholarship (2006) 2004 (1): 453–469.
Published: 01 September 2006
... of marking continu- ity by articulating a disconnection between new and old, even as ties between generations are affirmed. Revolution, though, is the constant, where each generation offers itself in the context of literary rebirth. The closing portion of Soto’s study uses Baldwin’s “Sonny’s...
Journal Article
American Literary Scholarship (2017) 2015 (1): 23–32.
Published: 01 September 2017
... the connection between readers and workers by “confronting” their audience’s implicit “culpabil- ity” in deplorable labor conditions, “even when physically removed from sites of industrialization and production.” These travelogue observations implore readers to absorb “the effects of industrialization...
Journal Article
American Literary Scholarship (2009) 2007 (1): 387–408.
Published: 01 September 2009
... memory” that is to blame for the fate that befell Cullen and, even more completely, the African American women poets whose work was also susceptible to charges of “bourgeois and feminine racelessness.” Where Kuenz is interested in explaining how Cullen came to be buried by changing...
Journal Article
American Literary Scholarship (2016) 2014 (1): 129–149.
Published: 01 September 2016
..., the Grand Dukes of Tuscany, Lincoln Steffens, and Benito Mus- solini—stand for good government, distributionist economics, and an ideal of democracy (yes, even under Fascism) as providing government responsible to the people—that is to say, to the numerous and hitherto disempowered debtor classes...
Journal Article
American Literary Scholarship (2011) 2009 (1): 449–463.
Published: 01 September 2011
... vogue for cellophane costumes and draperies to such writers as Wallace Stevens, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Nella Larsen, and Gertrude Stein. Recent scholarship on modernism has often been more iconoclastic than enthusiastic, and it has especially emphasized the multiple, divergent, or even mutually...
Journal Article
American Literary Scholarship (2001) 1999 (1): 361–388.
Published: 01 September 2001
... Brown adds narrative to the form of the work song in ‘‘Southern Road a form of resistance and control, not defeat. In ‘‘Strong Men a dialogue of narrative voice and folk voices establishes collective forms that have meant survival even as they tell a story of tragedy. So the poetic road...
Journal Article
American Literary Scholarship (2002) 2000 (1): 61–90.
Published: 01 September 2002
..., and insipid conversations on art and life with the alcoholic bohemians of Pfa√ ’s beer cellar, a group that accepted Whitman as a poet but never appealed to him as an ideal audience for his poems. ‘‘The Civil War saved Walt Whitman Morris argues. It rein- vigorated his life, bringing him respect and even...