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Journal Article
Agricultural History (2021) 95 (2): 276–310.
Published: 01 April 2021
.... 21. Chu Kang-hyŏn, “Ilche singminji sidae ‘Ture’ ŭi munhakchŏk hyŏngsanghwa: Ture wa munhak ŭi him, p’ungsok ŭi him [Literary Descriptions of Ture in the Japanese Colonial Period: Ture and the Power of Literature and Custom],” Han’guk munhwa yŏn’gu [ A Study on Korean Culture ] 1 (Jan. 1998): 238...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2004) 78 (3): 371–373.
Published: 01 July 2004
... of increasingly hostile corporation-based agricul? ture. The scholarly reader, however, will find Creating Abundance lacking in intellectual rigor and robustness. The selection of success stories seems en? tirely too systematic to draw the conclusions that Drache does. Seeking suc? cess, he has found it. How many...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2005) 79 (4): 492–494.
Published: 01 October 2005
... compellingly about "na? ture" in the US West,1 this book is not particularly focused on land in any of the conventional scholarly senses: as a contested field of value (in, say, the rise of "conservation as part of a dynamic ecology, or as a form of property. Nor does Riley state clearly why she focuses...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2006) 80 (3): 361–363.
Published: 01 July 2006
... essays and briefly looks ahead. He emphasizes the message prevalent throughout the work that intensive agricul? ture is not a novel, recent "invention" in Africa but has historic roots. Adams explains how technical experts and politicians, for example, often fail to recog? nize the wide variety...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2002) 76 (3): 605–606.
Published: 01 July 2002
... in Lumpkin, Georgia; executive director of Thronateeska Heritage Foundation in Albany, Georgia; and agricultural historian of the Alabama Agricultural Museum Board in Dothan, Alabama, where he helped to develop the official state museum of agricul? ture. Jerry was particularly adept at researching...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2002) 76 (4): 689–697.
Published: 01 October 2002
.... "Cultivation Conflict: Tmproved' Agricul? ture and Modernization in Colonial Zimbabwe, 1920-1965." University of Minnesota, 2000. Asia Chari, Sharad. "The Agrarian Question Comes to Town: Making Knitwear Work in Tiruppur, South India." University of California, Berkeley, 2000. Raymond, Chad Emerson. "Rational...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2005) 79 (3): 281–297.
Published: 01 July 2005
... Economies44 ( Dec. 1962 ): 1203 -11 Wayne C. Rohrer , "Agrarianism and the Social Organization of US Agricul¬ ture: The Concomitance of Stability and Change," Rural Sociology35 ( Mar. 1970 ): 5 -14 Frederick H. Buttel and William L. Flinn, "Sources and Consequences of Agrarian...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2000) 74 (2): 227–240.
Published: 01 April 2000
...Olaf F. Larson; Julie N. Zimmerman Copyright 2000 Agricultural History Society 2000 [Footnotes] 1 Office of the Secretary , "Report of the Committee Appointed by the Secretary of Agricul¬ ture to Consider the Subject of Farm Life Studies as One of the Divisions of Research...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2002) 76 (4): 710–711.
Published: 01 October 2002
...Neil Nakadate Working the Garden: American Writers and the Industrialization of Agriculture . William Conlogue . Copyright 2002 Agricultural History Society 2002 710 / Agricultural History Working the Garden: American Writers and the Industrialization of Agricul? ture. By William...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2001) 75 (4): 529–530.
Published: 01 October 2001
... business during the farm crisis, he had to use the new large round heavy hay bales and make silage from hay (i.e., haylage), which entailed purchasing new harvesting equip? ment in addition to large and expensive silos. This history is compelling reading. As Hoffbeck skillfully shows the na? ture...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2006) 80 (3): 269–295.
Published: 01 July 2006
... of technological processes and business prac? tices. Rather than focusing his analysis on the technological feasibility of mass-producing agricultural commodities, he defines industrial agricul? ture in terms of organizational and cooperative relationships. Yet, the ap? plication of various technologies...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2001) 75 (3): 358–359.
Published: 01 July 2001
.... This eclectic volume of thirteen essays is based on papers presented at the 1996 and 1997 annual meetings of the Vernacular Architecture Forum. The editors introduce the volume by reminding us that vernacular architec? ture originally tended "to focus on the old, the rural, and the handmade" (xix). Today...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2001) 75 (4): 503–504.
Published: 01 October 2001
... rural poor in Costa Rica and an even more am- bitious theoretical argument on the nature of social movements in post- modern social science. Edelman combines a wide ranging review of the contemporary literature on both social movements and agrarian social struc? ture in the 1980s and 1990s...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2000) 74 (1): 105–106.
Published: 01 January 2000
..., manure, and mortality in American cul? ture." These sections are forced, strained, and unconvincing. His attempt to discover "the Tao of pig" ultimately brings down the book, but not before the patient reader gains a good deal of knowledge about the place of pigs in America today, in our future...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2000) 74 (4): 835–836.
Published: 01 October 2000
... in Kansas before the Civil War. T-Town on the Plains may not be a model study to be emulated by all fu? ture local history scholars, but it boldly seeks to confront and answer the question that haunts all such scholarship: Why should we care? For the most part, Professor Lee demonstrates White City's...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2004) 78 (2): 238–239.
Published: 01 April 2004
..., but they also yielded pollution and class conflict. Internal improvements, such as the canal and railroad, enabled Americans to conquer space and bind to? gether disparate sections, but they also concentrated wealth, despoiled na? ture, and enervated farmers dependent upon distant markets. Irrigation promised...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2005) 79 (4): 491–492.
Published: 01 October 2005
... compellingly about "na? ture" in the US West,1 this book is not particularly focused on land in any of the conventional scholarly senses: as a contested field of value (in, say, the rise of "conservation as part of a dynamic ecology, or as a form of property. Nor does Riley state clearly why she focuses...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2008) 82 (2): 241–242.
Published: 01 April 2008
... institutions, and agricul tural diversity cultivated or managed within swidden-fallow fields. The cross-cultural comparison of swidden agriculture inYunnan iswell repre sented inPart III of the book. Finally, Part IV argues that swidden agricul ture as a co-evolution of a cultural-ecological system calls...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2008) 82 (2): 236–237.
Published: 01 April 2008
... managed to reintroduce agricul ture therefore did so without themyriad economic and agroecological ben efits of livestock. Following various blows to farming ecology and economy, a century of authoritarian political rule operating under the economic im peratives of colonialism, socialism...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2008) 82 (3): 393–394.
Published: 01 July 2008
... discussion of-and excellent introduction to-Roman agricul ture. They also examine the cultivation of olives and grapes, and the eco nomic strategies of peasants, as well as those whose production was geared more toward themarket. In order tounderstand the grainmarket, Erdkamp looks farbeyond themarketplace...