1-20 of 494 Search Results for

say

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2013) 87 (4): 473–501.
Published: 01 October 2013
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2009) 83 (4): 558–559.
Published: 01 October 2009
... clearinthisvolumehowpoorlyagriculturies doingeconomicallyc,omparedto othereconomicsectorsw, hichhavebenefittedmuchmorefromliberalizationP.eople are leavingvillagesin huge numbersandfloodingcitiesB. utthatis invisiblehere. Needlessto say,farmersuicidesand perilousdebtdependencyin rural Indiado notappearin thesepages...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2011) 85 (2): 290–291.
Published: 01 April 2011
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2016) 90 (2): 267–268.
Published: 01 April 2016
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2017) 91 (1): 138–140.
Published: 01 January 2017
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2020) 94 (1): 24–60.
Published: 01 January 2020
... women says little about this important energy transition before electricity and gas. For rural and farm households, where the alternative was coal or wood, oil offered significant benefits, and to farm women especially it was a godsend. Oil was cleaner, quicker, cooler, lighter, and more portable...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2015) 89 (3): 426–443.
Published: 01 July 2015
... entailed. They were most concerned about what, in retrospect, they called “male domination” and “female sub-ordination,” which, at the time, was epitomized by the saying: “The man is the boss; the father is the head of the house.” In their eyes, working for wages before they married, contributing...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2023) 97 (4): 513–546.
Published: 01 November 2023
... Robin Wall Kimmerer says, “sovereign persons.” As Indigenous women spread the Three Sisters across the continent, these plants and the attendant corn cosmologies provided narratives to explain human ancestry and evolution. Such creation stories attracted Indigenous immigrants to Cahokia, Indigenous...
Image
Published: 01 May 2022
Figure 5. Near Macon, Georgia, 1895. The 1895 fruit crop was an “enormous” one, a fact overlooked by railroad leaders, who justified high freight rates by saying that growers' promises of increased production “did not materialize.” Photograph by O. Pierre Havens. Source: Stovall, Fruits More
Image
Published: 01 November 2023
on the occasion of India's Republic Day, followed by vilification of the farmers in general. Mannat says, “While the air was ripe with despair and confusion, there were many whose resolve had only strengthened. Among those I saw that day were these two children, giggling and staring out of a tear in a tarpaulin More
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2015) 89 (3): 371–379.
Published: 01 July 2015
... becoming overcommitted, she tried to rein in my natural tendency to say yes to every institutional demand on my time. (more on that in a moment.) my mentor died a few years 372 2015 Productive Scholarship at a Teaching Institution ago far too soon but even now i hear her voice in the back of my mind...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2003) 77 (4): 553–556.
Published: 01 October 2003
... questioning of the core concepts and measurements would be healthy. But in history the pendulum has swung too far the other way. Many historians adopt rationalizations for rejecting quantification entirely (to say nothing of economies), and when these views are passed on to students, the result is a group...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2012) 86 (1): 1–25.
Published: 01 January 2012
... of Kentucky , 2007 ), 3 . Freyfogle says , “Agrarianism, broadly conceived, reaches beyond food production and rural living to include a wide constellation of ideas, loyalties, sentiments, and hopes. It is a temperament and a moral orientation as well as a suite of economic practices, all arising out...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2020) 94 (4): 562–567.
Published: 01 October 2020
...Jonathan Dekel-Chen © 2020 Agricultural History Society 2020 NOTES 1. Matthew Norris, et al., Agrihoods: Cultivating Best Practices (Washington, DC: The Urban Land Institute, 2018); Kevin Brass, “What Does the Farmer Say about Agrihoods?” Urbanland , Oct. 7, 2019, https...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2022) 96 (1-2): 259–261.
Published: 01 May 2022
... are embedded in the nonhuman world. This is more than saying that nonhuman forces shape history, more than merely saying that an earthquake or typhoon can shape human events. Rather, it is the view that all sorts of things we take to be fundamentally human or social—things like capitalism or colonialism—become...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2011) 85 (1): 140.
Published: 01 January 2011
... becomes irritating. Rasmussen reiterates the significance of changing transport costs. I would have welcomed remarks about opportunity costs, and their decline as public, fare-charging transport picks up. Ox Cart to Automobile says little about the Genesee Valley Canal and the Erie Railroad, and intercity...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2010) 84 (1): 105–107.
Published: 01 January 2010
... practicallyeverybodywho knewhim- not to mentionquite a fewmore who,up to thatpoint,had not.Sufficeitto say,itwas a happydayindeed foranyone withinhis circleof acquaintanceswhen he and Constance Pierce partneredup and his palpable miseryand angstsuddenlydisappeared intoa sense of happinessand a fulfillmentthatwas...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2014) 88 (1): 18–21.
Published: 01 January 2014
... of the wild plums growing along the ditch. I suppose I could say it was the place where I developed my historical imagination but it s probably more true to say that it s where I wrecked clothes, got dirty, and exasperated my mother. Q. You ve done quite a bit of research on the Dust Bowl. What was it like...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2018) 92 (3): 452–455.
Published: 01 July 2018
... that economic historians focused on India or the United States can offer. Of course, this is not to say that its emphasis on consumer culture is not of social or economic historical import. It is to say, however, that the narrative is one that tends to stay largely above ground level, an observation...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2000) 74 (1): 123–124.
Published: 01 January 2000
...-inclusive ecology of the vineyard that takes in the composition of the bedrock, the timing of the frost, the amount and intensity of rainfall, and interestingly, says Wil? son, the technique and soul of the vigneron. Wine is not a commodity, says Wilson, but a finely crafted product, each vintage...