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bison

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Journal Article
Agricultural History (2008) 82 (1): 121–122.
Published: 01 January 2008
...Martin J. Marchello To Save the Wild Bison: Life on the Edge in Yellowstone . Mary Ann Franke . Copyright 2008 Agricultural History Society 2008 2008 Book Reviews towns. Today petroleum, irrigation, and cotton join livestock, wheat, and dry farming to sustain people in a challenging...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2016) 90 (2): 267–268.
Published: 01 April 2016
...Nathan F. Sayre Pemmican Empire: Food, Trade, and the Last Bison Hunts in the North American Plains, 1780–1882 . By George Colpitts . Cambridge : Cambridge University Press , 2015 . 316 pp., $90.00 , hardback, ISBN 978-1-107-04490-6. © 2016 the Agricultural History Society 2016...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2018) 92 (2): 282–283.
Published: 01 April 2018
..., but he sets their roles against an economic backdrop. Moving beyond a classic environmental context of vast prairies, countless bison, cattle herds, and the march of progress, Wise examines a wider cast in describing the productive capacities of the West. White settlers and ranchers do not merely follow...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2008) 82 (1): 120–121.
Published: 01 January 2008
... University of Oklahoma To Save theWild Bison: Life on theEdge Franke. Norman: University of Oklahoma hardback,ISBN 0-8061-3683-9. inYellowstone. By Mary Ann Press, 2005. 309 pp., $29.95, Mary Ann Franke has taken on a monumental task inwriting this book because of all the players involved and each...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2023) 97 (4): 513–546.
Published: 01 November 2023
... than the peoples of the more arid plains. In the northern plains, the Mandan coupled húupatka to the local trade in and ritualization of bison, which amplified the plant's significance. Húupatka and bison represented blood, fertility, and creation. Thus húupatka could complement rather than contradict...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2011) 85 (2): 279–280.
Published: 01 April 2011
... introduced new goods and encouraged the hunting of beaver. Epidemics also came to southwestern Illinois, and disease, trade wars, and mourning wars decimated native villages, while intense hunting destroyed much of the region s bison, bear, and beaver. The decline in beaver meant fewer dams, a 279...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2018) 92 (2): 283–285.
Published: 01 April 2018
... then shifts the focus to meat production, examining bison and later cattle slaughter and processing. Human predators replaced wolves in this effort, and the author makes it clear that meat production began long before white ranchers brought their cattle to the plains. In shifting native human populations like...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2019) 93 (1): 202–204.
Published: 01 January 2019
... of the American bison. Federal efforts to pen the last remaining bison in national parks marked the end of the struggle between hunting and wealth on one side, and law and order on the other that has characterized the American story ever since the first colonial promoters touted the unparalleled bounty...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2018) 92 (2): 280–282.
Published: 01 April 2018
... into the retelling of Western history, including key agricultural themes. His account includes the familiar human and non-human actors, but he sets their roles against an economic backdrop. Moving beyond a classic environmental context of vast prairies, countless bison, cattle herds, and the march of progress, Wise...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2004) 78 (2): 243–245.
Published: 01 April 2004
..., there is a huge difference between knowing how to use every part of a slaughtered bison and making use of every part of every slaughtered bison. Similar shortcomings in historical details can be found in other portions of Book Reviews / 245 the guide, yet these should not detract from Cable and Maley's overall...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2003) 77 (4): 636–638.
Published: 01 October 2003
.... "Bison Ecology and Bison Diplomacy Redux: Another Look at the South? ern Plains from 1800-1850," originally published in the Journal of American History in 1991, builds on this argument. Whatever their religious convictions and practices, and whatever their view of nature, the Indians of the Great Plains...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2007) 81 (2): 281–283.
Published: 01 April 2007
... bison to cattle (far less so, indeed, than by the arrival of bison themselves thirteen thousand years earlier). Similarly, the shift from horsepower to tractors engendered little land use or basic environmental change. Irrigation and synthetic fertilizers are two additional recent agricultural...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2018) 92 (2): 244–260.
Published: 01 April 2018
... that musical practices have been a catalyst for the process of contemporary self-identification as well as the acceptance of community members through distinctive performance. The scope of this paper, situated in the eras of the Northwest trade, bison hunt, and new agricultural economies, mirrors the work...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2024) 98 (1): 120–122.
Published: 01 February 2024
... Bison Society and the Audubon Society pitched their species restoration goals primarily to white settler tourists and hunters. Scientists saw opportunities on those lands as well: the Ecological Society of America initially argued that grasslands—formerly part of the Great Sioux Reservation—could...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2024) 98 (1): 125–127.
Published: 01 February 2024
... to past eras of destruction in the West, such as the 1872–73 bison hunts. Now, the primary agents of destruction are the huge livestock businesses of Southwest Kansas. Local farmers pump millions of acre-feet of water per year (three times more water than needed to sustain New York City in a single year...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2015) 89 (3): 472–473.
Published: 01 July 2015
... (whether bison or wheat), the edge offered a range of resources and economic opportunities, many of which linked north and south, such as timbering and freighting. The forest edge was characterized by its suitability for mixed farming, and when combined with a variety of off-farm work, proved again...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2017) 91 (3): 447–448.
Published: 01 July 2017
... sheds some useful light on the animals that became directly or indirectly ubiquitous in emigrants minds and perceptions en route west. Bison, grizzly bears, rattlesnakes, wolves, prairie dogs, mosquitos, and a host of other wildlife played on the fears and anxieties of travelers as much as their meat...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2011) 85 (2): 280–281.
Published: 01 April 2011
... increased the complexity of relationships and generated new wars with the Potawatomi. Many of the surviving Mechigamea began crossing the Mississippi. French, French-Indian, and British farmers drained marshlands, and surviving bison left the area to seek better grass and to avoid hunters and greenflies...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2011) 85 (2): 278–279.
Published: 01 April 2011
..., trade wars, and mourning wars decimated native villages, while intense hunting destroyed much of the region s bison, bear, and beaver. The decline in beaver meant fewer dams, a 279 ...
Journal Article
Agricultural History (2023) 97 (2): 177–214.
Published: 01 May 2023
... came from game's dire outlook. Bison seemed all but extinct, the passenger pigeon was fading fast, and even white-tailed deer were in trouble. Beaver had become relatively rare in the nation's streams and ponds, and plume hunters raided heron and egret rookeries with increasing rapaciousness. 4...
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