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Notes

1. For a good discussion of the range of approaches employed in material culture, see Karen Harvey,
“Introduction: Practical Matters,”
in
History and Material Culture: A Student’s Guide to Approaching Alternative Sources
, ed. Karen Harvey (
London
:
Routledge
,
2009
),
1
23
. Other useful texts on the study of material culture include Christopher Tilley et al., eds.,
Handbook of Material Culture
(
London
:
Sage Publications
,
2013
); Arthur Asa Berger,
What Objects Mean: An Introduction to Material Culture
, 2nd ed. (
New York
:
Routledge
,
2016
); and the classic works of Thomas J. Schlereth, ed.,
Material Culture: A Research Guide
(
Lawrence
:
University Press of Kansas
,
1985
); and Thomas J. Schlereth,
Cultural History and Material Culture: Everyday Life, Landscapes, Museums
(
Charlottesville
:
University Press of Virginia
,
1992
).
2. Laurel Thatcher Ulrich,
The Age of Homespun: Objects and Stories in the Creation of an American Myth
(
New York
:
Alfred A. Knopf
,
2001
).
3. Sherry Turkle, ed.,
Evocative Objects: Things We Think With
(
Cambridge
:
MIT Press
,
2007
),
5
.
4. Debra A. Reid,
Interpreting Agriculture at Museums and Historic Sites
(
New York
:
Rowman & Littlefield
,
2017
).

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