As I write this review in late 2022, the World Food Programme warns on its home page that 345 million people in eighty-two countries “are facing acute food insecurity” (https://www.wfp.org/emergencies/global-food-crisis). Averting catastrophe, the organization insists, requires rising “to the challenge of meeting people's immediate food needs, while at the same time supporting programmes that build long-term resilience.” The crisis has multiple origins—COVID-19 and the Russian invasion of Ukraine come the most readily to mind—but there are deeper systemic problems that long predate the current emergencies. These are the problems that food sovereignty activists have been fighting for decades to solve. It has not been an easy struggle, but change, as Matthew Canfield's book, Translating Food Sovereignty, makes clear, has happened in the recent past and is happening in the present as activists claiming food sovereignty are “actively transforming regulation to reflect their vision of decentralized, diverse, and...

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