Many of us reading this journal have taught agricultural history in some form. The roles of animals, crops, soil, diseases, gardens, and tractors, to only name a few, are key ingredients in understanding numerous parts of our individual and collective pasts. As a result, the venues of learning can be just as diverse as the topics' influential reach. Many of the stories we tell in our university survey classes, highly specialized graduate courses, or with students in K–12 classes include agricultural history, sometimes in quite unexpected ways for both the learner and the lecturer. Agricultural history stretches across disciplinary fields and spaces of learning, and it manifests inside formalized classrooms and outside across informal ones, often in literal fields.

A key lesson, then, is that to teach agricultural history is to connect learners in visceral ways just as much as intellectual ones. Feeling freshly tilled soil or smelling a...

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