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successfully colonized

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Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2017) 20 (4): 413–422.
Published: 02 October 2017
..., they can easily pass through multiple barriers during biological invasions and successfully colonize new locations. In introduced ranges, dinocysts often serve as seeds for harmful algal blooms, which can result in large-scale environmental disasters and economic losses. Correct identification of dinocysts...
Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2019) 22 (4): 371–384.
Published: 02 October 2019
... other countries. However, nationwide documentation of the established alien fishes is still lacking and their ecological risk is unclear. We compiled a comprehensive inventory of the colonized alien fish species based on various sources, and then provided a summary of their potential ecological risk...
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Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2017) 20 (3): 285–294.
Published: 03 July 2017
... Coast of North America. These playback types were rotated through sound systems on the three new islands, and a control island had no equipment. Two-hundred and seventy-three pairs of Common Terns successfully nested in the new habitat, and 244 chicks were hatched. However, we did not find evidence...
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Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2012) 15 (sup1): 84–92.
Published: 01 January 2012
... habitats. Copyright © AEHMS 2012 artificial waterways successfully colonized marine biota The shallow sea forming the Gulf is situated in a subtropical arid zone, bordered by oil and gas rich states undergoing rapid population expansion. The low sloping Arabian coast line is mostly...
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Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2017) 20 (4): 423–434.
Published: 02 October 2017
... al., 2010 ; Carney et al., 2011 ; Baek et al., 2012 ). Such an approach can provide a valuable insight into the potential of phytoplankton to successfully colonize upon discharge into local aquatic ecosystems. Populations in a new environment will face further challenges during the first few...
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Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2014) 17 (4): 374–381.
Published: 02 October 2014
... shown to be important for early life stages of the commercially important Pike-Perch (Ginter et al., 2011 ). These species have been particularly well studied in waters where they recently have been introduced (Yan et al., 2011 ). Once they successfully colonize, they have been found to profoundly...
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Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2017) 20 (4): 378–383.
Published: 02 October 2017
...Hugh J. MacIsaac; Mattias L. Johansson Considerable attention has been focused on the concept of Propagule Pressure (number of individuals introduced and introduction events) as a predictor of invasion success (975 papers). Much less well studied is the role of Colonization Pressure (number...
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Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2007) 10 (2): 201–211.
Published: 08 June 2007
... promoted its introduction into most Latin American countries, Italy, France and Japan. It was reported to have been introduced into Lake Poopó in 1946 by sport fishermen ( Bustamante and Treviño, 1980 ), and by ascending in Desaguadero River successfully colonized Lake Titicaca. It is a superficial...
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Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2005) 8 (1): 81–94.
Published: 01 January 2005
... to quantify the distribution and area of important productive marine habitats using remote sensing techniques (Vousden, 1987 ; Kwarteng and Al-Ajmi, 1997 ; Turner et al., 1999 ) and results have been used successfully in integrated coastal management (ICM) plans to designate sensitive areas for protection...
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Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2016) 19 (2): 192–205.
Published: 02 April 2016
... but four years (2007–2010), when the highest proportion of nests (26–34%) occurred on Farr I. ( Table S1 ). Artificial nesting platforms for DCCO that were incorporated into the design of Centre I. (Quinn et al. 1996 ) were occupied at capacity annually since 1998. During 2004–2006: Cormorants colonized...
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Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2005) 8 (4): 375–395.
Published: 01 October 2005
... natural resource, shared by Canada and the United States. They contain almost 20% of the world's fresh surface water ( GLIN, 2005 ). Since European colonization of North America began in the 1600s, numerous stressors that can be directly attributed to human activities have been shown to affect...
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Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2004) 7 (1): 161–168.
Published: 01 January 2004
... (1974) , disappeared from the reservoir. Nowadays, fish have started to re-colonize the system (Mangas-Ramírez, pers. obs.) Figure 4. Fish in Valsequillo Dam, 1994–95. (A) Total numbers of animals collected. (B) Species composition. The Valsequillo dam has a problem of excess nutrient...
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Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2008) 11 (4): 412–421.
Published: 09 December 2008
... Zealand mud snail ( Potamopyrgus antipodarum ), has successfully invaded Europe, Australia ( Ponder, 1988 ), Japan (e.g. Shimada and Urabe, 2003 ), and, most recently, North America ( Bowler, 1991 ; Zaranko et al., 1997 ). It was first discovered in the Great Lakes in 1991 in the northeast and southwest...
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Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2000) 3 (1): 105–135.
Published: 01 January 2000
.... and Loftus , D.H. 1987 . Colonization of inland lakes in the Great Lakes region by rainbow smelt, Omserus mordax : their freshwater niche and effects on indigenous fishes . Can. J. Fish. Aquat. Sci. , 44 ( Suppl. 2 ): 249 – 266 . Evans , D.O. and Waring , P. 1987 . Changes...
Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2016) 19 (2): 206–218.
Published: 02 April 2016
... collected during the summer sampling period (June–September) by Environment Canada (Hiriart-Baer et al., 2016 ) from 1988–2012. Submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) was assessed using the methods described in Leisti et al. ( 2016 ) for % cover, depth of colonization, and bed extent. For each...
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Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2014) 17 (4): 394–403.
Published: 02 October 2014
... ecosystem, there are few or no management options for control. However, in the case of Sea Lamprey and Alewife, lake managers were able to successfully control populations and, in the specific case for Alewife, were able to provide socio-economic benefits from control measures. For Sea Lamprey, a chemical...
Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2019) 22 (4): 462–472.
Published: 02 October 2019
... for local people, without regard of the potential negative effects on local fish richness (i.e. Espinoza-Pérez and Ramírez, 2015 ). In Mexico, the populations of the Amazon Sailfin Catfish ( Pterygoplichthys pardalis Castelnau, 1855) have rapidly increased and successfully established in freshwater...
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Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2001) 4 (3): 293–309.
Published: 01 September 2001
... et al. (1996) successfully used wetland plant communities as indicators of trophic status. Species composition is known to change with the addition of organic pollution (Husák et al., 1989). Preliminary efforts by the United States Environmental Protection Agency have incorporated the percentage...
Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2004) 7 (2): 289–303.
Published: 01 April 2004
... the numbers and sizes of individuals metamorphosing, but it also determines which species successfully develop and ultimately species richness of a wetland ( Collins and Wilbur, 1979 ; Pechmann et al., 1989 ; Rowe and Dunson, 1995 ; Skelly, 1996 ; Wellborn et al., 1996 ; Snodgrass et al., 2000 ; Paton...
Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2004) 7 (1): 73–84.
Published: 01 January 2004
..., they successfully reproduced only in wetlands lacking tiger salamanders. Artificially extending the hydroperiod of wetlands by excavation has greatly influenced the composition of native biotic communities adapted to the naturally short hydroperiods of wetlands in this semi-arid region. The compositional change...
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