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development stage

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Published: 28 November 2007
Figure 2. Size frequency distribution of oocytes in each stage of development of the ovary (II-VI) of O. niloticus in the Nyanza Gulf of Lake Victoria More
Image
Published: 01 October 2016
Figure 2. Total copepod number (individuals m −3 ) according to the stages of development in the northern Lake Tanganyika (pelagic and littoral sampling waters) during the study period. More
Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2016) 19 (4): 401–410.
Published: 01 October 2016
...Figure 2. Total copepod number (individuals m −3 ) according to the stages of development in the northern Lake Tanganyika (pelagic and littoral sampling waters) during the study period. ...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2018) 21 (4): 409–420.
Published: 02 October 2018
... in the Stage II RAP, in conjunction with prior major actions such as the development of the Western Lake Superior Sanitary District in the late-1970s, were funded and completed. For example, between 1978 and 2010 it is estimated that: approximately $320 million was spent on wastewater treatment improvements...
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Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2001) 4 (3): 275–282.
Published: 01 September 2001
... fish, including inadequate gonad matu- ration and early life stage mortality (Norrgren et al., 1994). Abnormal gonad development may be caused by a num- ber factors, for example, toxicants, abiotic factors, nutri- tional status and parasites (Wiklund et al., 1996; Luksiene et al., 2000). In roach...
Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2002) 5 (2): 155–162.
Published: 01 June 2002
... the last stage in the development of the lake. Landslides modified the steep slopes, and large blocks of land were shifted vertically and horizontally along faults by slow tectonic movements. More sediments shed from the small region drained by the lake were being deposited and volcanism continued mostly...
Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2000) 3 (4): 485–497.
Published: 01 January 2000
... for Ondina seawater, used as a control. Gametes were collected from adult oysters by strip- ping the gonads from at least three individuals of each sex. The eggs were then fertilized and allowed to develop to the first cleavage stage before being counted. Embryos were distributed in the experimental j rs...
Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2011) 14 (4): 403–413.
Published: 01 October 2011
... with increasing weight as the fish developed from the yolk-sac stage, during which they possess a maternally-derived isotopic signature, to an exogenously feeding larvae. Trends in δ 15 N with increasing weight varied among species; an increase, decrease, and no change in δ 15 N were observed. A weight-based...
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Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2003) 6 (4): 391–396.
Published: 01 December 2003
...) and chronic (growth, development) endpoints were investigated. Bioassays were carried out until adult stage for both organisms. Concentrations with a significant effect compared with controls and effect concentrations for 50% of the organisms were determined. After 10 days (chironomids) or 14 days (hyalella...
Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2014) 17 (1): 14–24.
Published: 02 January 2014
... algal material, were added to each Petri dish/treatment whenever the water was renewed in the treatments. This provided a source of food to ripe females and males. Water temperature in the Petri dishes was recorded every 3 h during the experiment, and at the same time the developmental stages...
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Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2009) 12 (2): 168–176.
Published: 27 May 2009
... projections for the Caribbean region, and the likely increase of anthropogenic stresses such as coastal development, it is likely that the beach erosion trend will continue and increase. Nonexclusive approaches to help beaches adapt to climate change include structural, planning or ecological measures. Two...
Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2011) 14 (3): 252–259.
Published: 01 July 2011
... to generate data for setting policies, development planning, and management intervention. A study involving two-stage stratified sampling on the Tanzanian side of the lake showed that Nile Perch caught in the minimum legal 5” gillnets were immature by more than 80%. In contrast Nile Perch of ≥85 cm total...
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Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2014) 17 (4): 365–373.
Published: 02 October 2014
... of the ecosystem. This means producing knowledge of all stages of the life cycle of Salmon and Trout, which will demand collaboration between habitat specialists. Further, efforts must develop communication between scientists, managing authorities and other stakeholders in both Sweden and Norway. In addition...
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Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2018) 21 (3): 342–351.
Published: 03 July 2018
...M. Choy; D. Lawrie; C. B. Edge Instream barriers (e.g. dams, weirs and road crossings) fragment aquatic habitat and prevent the upstream movement of fish, impairing the ability of fishes to complete critical life stages, access critical habitat and for dispersal among local populations. Mitigation...
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Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2016) 19 (4): 452–460.
Published: 01 October 2016
.... This species moves out into open sea deeper water for spawning (Basson et al., 1977 ) and developing larval stages drift back to shallow water where they complete development. Lai et al., ( 2010 ) describe male P. segnis from 3.7 cm carapace width and females from 4.5 cm as being mature, indicating...
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Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2018) 21 (2): 152–158.
Published: 03 April 2018
..., by examining gonads appearance to determine their developmental stage and by following the evolution of their gonado-somatic index (GSI). According to Barcellos et al. ( 2001 ), GSI has been proven to be a significant parameter for monitoring gametogenesis progression in teleost fish. Monthly samples...
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Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2007) 10 (4): 443–448.
Published: 28 November 2007
...Figure 2. Size frequency distribution of oocytes in each stage of development of the ovary (II-VI) of O. niloticus in the Nyanza Gulf of Lake Victoria ...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2006) 9 (1): 111–115.
Published: 01 January 2006
..., as it is still in its developing stage. The major problems are illustrated as follows: 1) there are unclear jurisdictions over coastal management, such as overlapping in investigations, monitoring, surveillance and scientific research of marine environment, which lead to the unnecessary loss of human, material...
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Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2015) 18 (4): 443–453.
Published: 02 October 2015
... on the use of pointers (Blayo and Debreu, 1999 ). During the development stage of the Prince William Sound system, the nesting between model domains (between L0 and L1, and between L1 and L2) was one-way. The coarse-resolution domain provides boundary conditions for the fine-resolution domain...
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Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2020) 23 (3): 373–384.
Published: 02 July 2020
.... The climate change effect can be minimized by controlling factors that have additive effect with climate factors and applying adaptation strategies. Applying CHANS framework to analyze human-nature connections and mutual influences during different tourism development stages of Jiuzhaigou reveals insights...
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Includes: Supplementary data