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commercial catch quotas

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Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2009) 12 (1): 23–28.
Published: 09 March 2009
... ( Coregonus clupeaformis ) index netting project. The impetus for this undertaking was concern that adequate information was not available for the derivation of the commercial catch quotas by the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources. Traditional First Nation fishing waters were sampled from 2000 to 2004...
Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2015) 18 (2): 160–170.
Published: 03 April 2015
...I. V. Mitrofanov; N. Sh. Mamilov For many years fishing was one of the most important human activities in the Caspian Sea and Aral-Syr Darya basin. This article summarizes the results of research conducted by the authors during 1991–2010. Drastic shifts in commercial fish catches as well as in fish...
Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2011) 14 (3): 252–259.
Published: 01 July 2011
...–85 cm total length (TL) was instituted by the partner states to protect immature fish, and large adults to replenish the stocks while at the same time harvesting mature individuals. Catch Assessment Surveys, have been conducted regularly by the partner states between July 2005 and December 2008 to...
Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2014) 17 (1): 70–79.
Published: 02 January 2014
... (Ogutu-Ohwayo, 1990 ). Since 1980 the commercial fishery of Lake Victoria has been based on Nile Perch, Nile Tilapia and Dagaa which together make up 85–90% of the catch; a major shift from previous observations of 80% haplochromine catches. After the population explosion of Nile Perch in the early...
Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2008) 11 (4): 403–411.
Published: 09 December 2008
... ). Walleye harvest was primarily allocated to the recreational fishery but small quotas were established for commercial impoundment gear and to cover walleye incidental catch in the whitefish gillnet fishery. No commercial walleye harvest was permitted in the upper Bay of Quinte where the recreational...
Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2015) 18 (2): 195–204.
Published: 03 April 2015
... terms of fish harvest but it is not always true. According to Zimbalevskaya et al. ( 1989 ), before the Dnieper River was regulated, the total commercial fish yield averaged 4647 tonnes per year. After the construction of dams and reservoirs, in 1966−1985, the average total annual catch increased to 19...
Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (1999) 2 (3): 239–248.
Published: 01 January 1999
... areas, may have accrued to a user on a basis of a long period of continuous use (Loftus et al., 1980), but with only minor responsibilities, ay concerning disclosure of catches and fishing practices. Existing commercial fishers on Lake Erie were given first fight of access to quotas when they were...
Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2015) 18 (2): 184–194.
Published: 03 April 2015
... commercial fish.” In general, these comments are also relevant to the next historical period. Prior to the year 1952, rivers of the Sea of Azov basin were characterized by the natural flow regime, while anthropogenic impact at that time was relatively insignificant. During that period, the largest catches...
Includes: Supplementary data
Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2018) 21 (2): 168–175.
Published: 03 April 2018
... southern Lake Malawi (GoM, 2013b ). The small-scale commercial fishery includes all fishers that use engines of less than 20 horsepower or no engine to catch fish intended primarily for sale. The 2012 frame survey (census) showed that 1,663 gear owners and 11,315 fishing crew were counted in the southern...
Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2018) 21 (2): 139–151.
Published: 03 April 2018
... this area rather than moving to the northern district areas of the Lake. The policy should have reduced fishing effort in this area by implementing a strong monitoring control and surveillance system. The use of output regulations (quotas) in the commercial sector and also rights-based fishing in the...
Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2006) 9 (4): 391–405.
Published: 01 December 2006
... of traditional, artisanal, recreational and commercial fisheries; the status of this fishery is uncertain in the absence of any on-going catch records, though there are concerns about decline. Moreover, some of the species targeted are regarded as threatened by conservation agencies ( McDowall, 1984...
Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2006) 9 (4): 433–446.
Published: 01 December 2006
... et al., 2002 ). Signs of overfishing in the lake were reported as early as 1927 when catch rates for tilapia dropped from 50–100 fish per 50 m long net with 127 mm stretched mesh to less than five fish (Worthington and Worthington, 1933; cited in Ssentongo, 1972 ). As recently as the 1960s, Lake...
Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (2008) 11 (1): 50–60.
Published: 10 March 2008
... significantly reduced the commercial harvest. Sea lampreys were an international problem ( Smith and Elliott, 1952 ) and by the late 1940s, harvest of lake trout, a keystone species, had fallen by 99% from the average catch of the 1930s ( Fetterolf, 1980 ). The Canadian and U.S. Federal governments decided...
Journal Article
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management (1999) 2 (3): 197–207.
Published: 01 January 1999
... things for me. . . Picton was the epicentre of the Lake Ontario commerical fishery, and in addition to easy proximity to the vessels and their catches, it was easy to ride the boats and study the relationships between fishing effort and catch. . ." Through these observations and the work of others on the...