e-Duke Books

Doing Development in West Africa:

A Reader by and for Undergraduates

Edited by Charles Piot

In recent years the popularity of service learning and study abroad programs that bring students to the global South has soared, thanks to this generation of college students' desire to make a positive difference in the world. This collection contains essays by undergraduates who recount their experiences in Togo working on projects that established health insurance at a local clinic, built a cyber café, created a microlending program for teens, and started a local writers' group. The essays show students putting their optimism to work while learning that paying attention to local knowledge can make all the difference in a project's success. Students also conducted research on global health topics by examining the complex relationships between traditional healing practices and biomedicine. Charles Piot's introduction contextualizes student-initiated development within the history of development work in West Africa since 1960, while his epilogue provides an update on the projects, compiles an inventory of best practices, and describes the type of projects that are likely to succeed. Doing Development in West Africa provides a relatable and intimate look into the range of challenges, successes, and failures that come with studying abroad in the global South.

Contributors. Cheyenne Allenby, Kelly Andrejko, Connor Cotton, Allie Middleton, Caitlin Moyles, Charles Piot, Benjamin Ramsey, Maria Cecilia Romano, Stephanie Rotolo, Emma Smith, Sarah Zimmerman

Bibliographic Information

Title: 
Doing Development in West Africa: A Reader by and for Undergraduates
Edited by: 
  • Charles Piot
Published: 
2016-08-05
Copyright year: 
  • 2016
ISBN electronic: 
978-0-8223-7403-9
ISBN cloth: 
978-0-8223-6176-3
ISBN paper: 
978-0-8223-6192-3

Author Bio

  • Charles Piot is Professor of Cultural Anthropology and African and African American Studies at Duke University, and the author of Nostalgia for the Future: West Africa after the Cold War.

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